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Doug
06-24-2006, 07:57 AM
this is going to be a ridiculous question, and I am a bit embarrased to even ask. I bought a Sekonic light meter, and I think I have the controls down to how I need to use it. Will be using it mostly for reflected off of subjects. So, how do I point the meter. Do I point it at my subject like a TV remote, or what? Like I said, this should be easy for you pros..........thanks.

Norm in Fujino
06-24-2006, 09:08 AM
this is going to be a ridiculous question, and I am a bit embarrased to even ask. I bought a Sekonic light meter, and I think I have the controls down to how I need to use it. Will be using it mostly for reflected off of subjects. So, how do I point the meter. Do I point it at my subject like a TV remote, or what? Like I said, this should be easy for you pros..........thanks.

Hmm, that depends on what kind of light meter it is, and your purposes. If it has a white half-globe on it, it is meant for incident light; in that case, you hold it from the position of the subject and let the incident light (sun, flood lamps, etc.) fall on it.

If it doesn't have the white half-globe, it's probably a reflected light meter; in that case, you hold it from the position of the camera, and point it toward the subject. Depending on how wide the angle of view of the meter is, you point it at various parts of the subject exposed to the same light you are trying to meter. For example, a green grass lawn is usually considered to be "middle gray" in terms of reflectance, so if you were shooting a landscape, you might meter off the grass, or tree leaves with the same degree of reflectance. If you're shooting a portrait, you might have the subject hold a gray card exposed to the incident light, and you would meter off the gray card to get a "middle gray" reading. The important thing is, you must understand what you are trying to achieve, and how to adjust your exposure based on what the meter sees.
If you don't understand the above, I'd recommend you get a good basic book on photography and learn about basic exposure. It's fascinating and not that difficult to learn (the basics, anyway).

AlexMonro
06-24-2006, 10:43 AM
You might find this useful:

http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/understanding-series/understandexposure.shtml