PDA

View Full Version : how to take night scenery shots?



drew_viii
05-04-2006, 03:17 PM
hi there, ive been wondering on how to take nightshots, i know i need a tripod and everything, but the settings wasnt really that accurate... so lets say, its either to bright or to dark... i love london city nightshots, lights on the streets, and night on the sky... but seems like i couldnt get the right image... any comments and suggestions? do i really need a cokin ND grad filter or ND filter in order to achieve good night scenery shots? thank you

JTL
05-05-2006, 12:35 AM
I took this with a Canon S2...you certainly should get even a better exposure with a 30D...

Settings as follows: ISO 400, f/3.5, 1/4 sec.

http://JTL.smugmug.com/photos/55996684-L.jpg

~Kayla~
05-29-2006, 02:22 PM
I've misplaced my manual perhaps lost it. Could you tell me how to adjust my ISO settings. I have a Canon S2 IS too.

JTL
05-29-2006, 02:47 PM
Get the manual online here:

http://www.usa.canon.com/consumer/controller?act=DownloadDetailAct&fcategoryid=322&modelid=11368

~Kayla~
05-29-2006, 11:11 PM
Isn't it soooo true how when you need something you can't find it. I've been trying to find my manual for 2 months then a few hours ago when I WASN'T looking for it, it appears.

Thanks so much for the link which I will bookmark. I changed my settings and all is well. :)

Norm in Fujino
06-08-2006, 10:29 PM
hi there, ive been wondering on how to take nightshots, i know i need a tripod and everything, but the settings wasnt really that accurate... so lets say, its either to bright or to dark... i love london city nightshots, lights on the streets, and night on the sky... but seems like i couldnt get the right image... any comments and suggestions? do i really need a cokin ND grad filter or ND filter in order to achieve good night scenery shots? thank you

For most night scene photography, the tripod is much more important than any kind of filters. Even without a tripod, if you have a stable base, you can take shots of 1+ second. The real issues is what kind of light sources you have. Are there very bright point lights in the scene that are going to burn out those areas relative to other dark areas, or is the light relatively even over the entire scene? You really have to experiment and practice to figure these things out, since urban night scenes tend to differ from each other even more than daytime scenes due to the nature of the lighting.
In the following scene (1" @ f2.8, ISO 50), the city lighting was fairly evenly distributed, with the exception of the very bright light at the left. Even so, it wasn't so bright as to completely burn out the whites in the area and there was sufficient general lighting to illuminate the clouds a bit. I also did a bit of pp to lower the overall contrast and add a bit of saturation to the few available colors.

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c197/Peregrinor/P6060030_NW_w1.jpg

The next two are of the crossing in Shibuya made famous by "Lost in Translation." There are huge television/light walls all around this intersection that create quickly shifting patterns of light; these aren't the best possible examples, but they give you an idea. Both were taken at 1/60s, f2.8, ISO400.

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c197/Peregrinor/P6070058_NW_w1.jpg
Here, the light walls are so bright as to burn out and create near-daytime levels of light.

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c197/Peregrinor/P6070060_NW_w1.jpg
A minute later and the light wall at upper right has dimmed somewhat; even after bringing up levels in pp, the scene is darker than before.

(All these were taken with an Olympus C-755).