PDA

View Full Version : help please: low-lighting/no flash allowed?



nomad
05-04-2006, 12:56 PM
hi there. My husband has read quite a bit here, but this is my first time posting (he usually controls the camera).

We have a Kodak Z7590. I usually use one of the auto settings when i use it and have had decent luck. BUT, i have a challenge coming up (tomorrow, of course) and hope someone here can give me some advice. I'm going to a skating show where there will be varying lighting conditions throughout (show lighting is similar to concert lighting & also varies depending on how close the skaters & therefore lighting are to you.) I have seats close to the ice, so i'd really like to take some decent photos. 2 problems:

#1: Flash is not allowed. Big problem. With a very basic camera, i did get a few decent shots when skaters were directly in front of me & i hope for at least that.

#2: the issue of the camera automatically shutting off when it has been inactive, thereby losing whatever settings i have been using.

I would appreciate any advice you might have in terms of settings i might want to try, and issue #2. As i said, i am a relative novice. Good at seeing a photo, but son't know as much about the actual settings.

Thanks!

David Metsky
05-04-2006, 01:20 PM
1) This is going to be a problem. The only thing you can do is push the ISO up to 200 and hope for the best. You'll probably have best luck panning with the skaters, but you're going to have little light to work with. The camera is going to want to keep the shutter open longer and with a moving subject that's going to result in blurry images.

2) Many cameras have adjustable timers for inactive shutdown, and will allow you to turn that feature off. Check your owner's manual, I'm not familiar with that camera. Or, just touch the zoom very slighly every minute or so, that will reset the timer.

-dave-

DocsNotary
05-11-2006, 02:09 PM
The following quoted suggestion is from this old thread (http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4332&highlight=c-740) back in the Olympus forum:


I have a c-755 which is pretty similar, but all these comments should be taken as general advice only.
1. Set to the highest ISO possible (400); remember that this will, however, give you grainer shots--unavoidable when shooting indoors w/o flash. You can try shooting at 200 as well just to see whether its possible under the lighting conditions.

2. Set the camera for shutter priority exposure, and use the highest shutter speed possible under the lighting conditions. When you start seeing -1, -2, etc. on the indicator at top right of the screen, it means you're underexposed. You may be able to get away with -1 underexposure and then tweak it afterwards in somethink like Photoshop, but you probably won't get best results.

3. Half-press the shutter button to fix focus before pressing the rest of the way.

4. Remember in any case, these cameras have a certain degree of shutter lag, so you're probably not going to be able to capture perfect instants that you're hoping to.

5. One other thing: particularly if the indoor lighting is fluorescent, set your white balance to one of the fluroescent values and see how results differ...
I was surprised by suggestion #2 above, the shutter priority. Under these types of conditions I would typically use aperture priority, set to the widest available aperture, letting the camera select the shutter.

For those who would endorse #2 instead, why would you prefer that?

alex1
05-11-2006, 06:54 PM
Now, im a newbie and far from knowledgable but from my understanding you need fast shutter speeds, moving subjects.
ex:
you set aperture priority to f/2.8, your camera automatically chooses a shutter speed to slow and you get blur.

you set shutter priority you get faster shutter, no blur and camera will adjust aperture and iso in an attempt to properly expose.

I might be wrong so wait for more replies :)

DonSchap
05-11-2006, 08:21 PM
Have you considered the correct tool for the job, yet?

Sticking a square peg in a round hole still doesn't get it done, as far as I have heard.

If you have light conditions that require extreme settings, then you need a camera that can offer them. Trying to make your P&S camera do this will only lead to a very frustrating shoot and lots o' disappointment.

Let's see what a dSLR could offer you... just for fun:

Variable ISO from 100-3200, the higher the better, in this case (Canon EOS 20D) Reasonable cost telephoto for low light conditions (Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di lens) Full manual control of Aperture and Shutter speed, if auto just won't cut it (Canon EOS 20D) Tripod or monopod mounting, to stabilize the camera for slow shutter speeds (why the EOS 20D has that kind of mount!)


Hmmm, looks like a job for the EOS 20D and company. Right tool, right job...

Just a thought... :D

DocsNotary
05-12-2006, 01:09 PM
Now, im a newbie and far from knowledgable but from my understanding you need fast shutter speeds, moving subjects.
ex:
you set aperture priority to f/2.8, your camera automatically chooses a shutter speed to slow and you get blur.

you set shutter priority you get faster shutter, no blur and camera will adjust aperture and iso in an attempt to properly expose.

I might be wrong so wait for more replies :)
I understand your logic. What I'm thinking is that if I set the widest aperture, the camera would be forced to use the fastest shutter setting that properly exposes the shot. Your point about it being able to adjust the ISO also is well taken. I had not considered that. I guess I would also want to lock in the ISO--lets see, a higher ISO would also encourage a faster shutter for the exposure, while possibly introducing unwanted grain. Something to play with. Fortunately, while not being a true DSLR, my camera allows full manual controls.