PDA

View Full Version : Lighting



lksprague
04-28-2006, 07:00 PM
I am fairly new to the photography world and I'm wanting to get into portraits and weddings. However, I'm not sure on the lighting that would best suit me.

I've been looking at buying some lighting and I'm not sure if I sould get flood lighting or strobes. I'm currently set up in my basement which is bright enough; however, I get horrible shadows.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

JTL
04-28-2006, 09:26 PM
I am fairly new to the photography world and I'm wanting to get into portraits and weddings. However, I'm not sure on the lighting that would best suit me.

I've been looking at buying some lighting and I'm not sure if I sould get flood lighting or strobes. I'm currently set up in my basement which is bright enough; however, I get horrible shadows.

Any comments would be greatly appreciated.Try reading Master Lighting Guide for Portrait Photographers by Christopher Grey...it's kind of the lighting bible...

Another book that has some studio lighting ideas for those on a budget is Digital SLR Pro Secrets by David Busch. The info is in Chapter 6, so, if you don't need the whole book, just take notes from it in the bookstore...

lksprague
04-29-2006, 09:08 AM
Thanks, I'll check them out as soon as I can!!

calona
04-30-2006, 04:02 PM
I am fairly new to the photography world and I'm wanting to get into portraits and weddings. However, I'm not sure on the lighting that would best suit me.

I've been looking at buying some lighting and I'm not sure if I sould get flood lighting or strobes. I'm currently set up in my basement which is bright enough; however, I get horrible shadows.
Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

Where are the horrible shadows coming from i.e. the existing lights or windows letting in the daylight ? How high is the basement ceiling and what floor dimensions ?
One of the problems of using strobes is that you cannot see where the light is falling. With flood lighting you might run into colour correction problems. One would have to know all these parameters before giving advice.

lksprague
05-01-2006, 03:35 PM
the current shadows are coming from the over-head lighting. They are lights that can be aimed and in doing this i can almost do away with the shadow completely. The lights are also on dimmers. I could move the subject further away from the backdrop to eliminate them but I'm not sure how far away I cold go. There are no windows in the room so sunlight isn't an issue with shadows. As far as dimensions, the ceiling is only about 7 foot tall and I've got an area of about 8 foot by 12 foot.

calona
05-04-2006, 12:06 AM
You hav'nt got much room for a full length of the bride and groom at 12 feet and if you try moving them away from the background then you have even less. Using a wide angle lens to get them in the frame will cause perspective distortion. Also a 7 foot ceiling does not give you much room for lighting. Sorry but I think you are pushing your luck trying wedding photography in such a small amount of space. Heads and shoulders portraiture would be ok and I suggest you get a good book on lighting techniques as there is too much to learn from a forum posting. Good luck and sorry to be pessamistic but I really think you should go for outdoor locations for your weddings. Cheers.

lksprague
05-05-2006, 04:03 PM
I will not be doing wedding pictures in my basement, as the area as you said is too small. The wedding pictures will be taken at the church. In the basement I've been taking pictres mainly of children and infants. I don't have a lot of money to throw into this right now, so I'm trying to figure out what my best option is right now as far as lighting. Should I go with stobes or flood lighting?

calona
05-07-2006, 09:12 PM
As children are hard to control i.e. jumping around and moving I would go for strobes. Try white umbellas covering the flashes so as to soften the light and the more powerful they are the better as you can then diffuse them as you want. A flash meter would be a very useful tool. As for placing them I would suggest you get a good book on lighting starting with a main light and a fill. Ther are all sorts of things you could do; bounce flash, reflectors etc etc and a good book on lighting will show these. Good luck.

Esoterra
05-09-2006, 12:22 PM
I find that the best place to photograph kids is in places that they like to play...parks, museums ect. this way you get more genuine facial expressions and overall excitement... so your lighting is more dependant on location, weather, and time of day. In such a case, I rely heavily on fill flash from my speedlight to get the results I am looking for.