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alex1
04-28-2006, 10:15 AM
First i've read tons and want to regurgitate what i learned tell me if i understand correctly.

F/stop - opening size of aperture bigger = more light f/1.8 is more light than f/8
Higher more light can use faster shutter less blur but less DOF
slow increase DOF bad for action shots or if hands unsteady(blur)

Shutter - faster shutter = less light need a

iso - sensitivity able to capture photo with less light

Why would i want to use ISO if i have a good enough range of f/stops and shutter speeds? would it work in the following situation?

I have a properly exposed image but want to increase DOF but have no tripod, so adjust the f/stop and ISO instead of adjusting the shutter speed and then don't have to worry about blur as much.

Why not keep iso at say 400? the d50 does pretty good at 400.

please teach me.

wanna learn a bit more before buying my camera, I previously used a kodak dx6490 always on fully auto mode, and now i don't have a camera and want to learn and get a D50.

JTL
04-28-2006, 12:43 PM
Read these tutorials first...http://www.photoxels.com/digital-photography-tutorials.html

Then, buy and read this book: Understanding Exposre by Bryan Petersen

calona
04-30-2006, 04:09 PM
Quote
.

Why not keep iso at say 400? the d50 does pretty good at 400.

please teach me.

wanna learn a bit more before buying my camera, I previously used a kodak dx6490 always on fully auto mode, and now i don't have a camera and want to learn and get a D50.[/QUOTE]

At ISO 400 you get more noise i.e. the pix looks "grainier " that at 100 ISO.

Prospero
04-30-2006, 04:30 PM
I can hardly see the difference between ISO 200 and ISO 400. When I take pictures at ISO 400 they are still almost as clean as they are with ISO 200. Only at ISO 800 and 600 I get a significant amount of noise; I therefore avoid these ISO-values.

Setting the ISO is something I forget about easily. For instance, I recently took some important pictures of the family in broad daylight using ISO 800. The resulting pictures were a lot more grainy than they could have been. Therefore, I think that keeping your ISO at 400 is really not that bad an idea when you think you would otherwise forget to change it.

By the way, you could also use the auto ISO function of the D-50 and let the camera decide for you.

Travis9000
04-30-2006, 04:31 PM
If you just stay at one ISO, then you can not change the F-Stop. The F-stop, while controlling the amount of light coming in, also controls the depth of focus (I think that's what it is called)... like when you see a picture of a flower with a blurred background, if you change the F-Stop you can also make the background focused with the camera.

(and what Prospero said)

JTL
04-30-2006, 10:48 PM
If you just stay at one ISO, then you can not change the F-Stop.As stated, this is not true and is confusing.

ISO controls sensitivity to light. Aperture (f/stop) controls amount of light. On a camera with full manual control you can have any combination of ISO, f/stop and shutter speed. Exposing correctly...or I should say optimally, though, is a whole 'nother topic.

Read the book. You'll thank me.

alex1
05-02-2006, 11:20 AM
awesome. those tutorials are actually what i read before posting so i had an idea of what i was talking about. One last thing

so i want more depth of focus so i change the f/stop to say f/8 and then i would have to change the shutter speed, or can i use the iso to compensate for the lower amount of light so i don't have to worry about blur as much, understanding i would get more noise.

I think I will be order the book and the camera some time soon.

JTL
05-02-2006, 12:11 PM
awesome. those tutorials are actually what i read before posting so i had an idea of what i was talking about. One last thing

so i want more depth of focus so i change the f/stop to say f/8 and then i would have to change the shutter speed, or can i use the iso to compensate for the lower amount of light so i don't have to worry about blur as much, understanding i would get more noise.

I think I will be order the book and the camera some time soon.Bingo...

Now the best thing to do is put the knowledge to practice. Now that you have a grasp the concepts, there's nothing like going out and shooting and trying out many different, specific scenarios and then reviewing the results. Soon you will start to get a feel for what's required when...and you'll have a lot of fun in the process...:)