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View Full Version : Problem with sharp pictures - SD300



Stenton
10-28-2004, 02:56 PM
Hello, I'm a beginner to digital photography, so bare with me..

I have experienced problems while trying to take sharp pictures indoors without using the flash. I've been playing around with the different settings but I just can't seem to get it right. Could some one help me with the settings?

The manual they sent me was in french, thanks a lot!

olias
10-28-2004, 03:45 PM
Hi Stenton,

one word: tripod. Shooting indoors without a flash usually requires a tripod to prevent camera shake.

Stenton
11-03-2004, 02:13 PM
Thanks for your answer.

So without the flash I can't expect any sharp pictures indoors without a tripod? Thats a shame. But isn't that a question of shutter speed? Sorry if my questions are stupid, but I just don't realize why it is impossible to take sharp pictures in these conditions.

John_Reed
11-03-2004, 02:33 PM
Thanks for your answer.

So without the flash I can't expect any sharp pictures indoors without a tripod? Thats a shame. But isn't that a question of shutter speed? Sorry if my questions are stupid, but I just don't realize why it is impossible to take sharp pictures in these conditions.Whether a picture is sharp or blurry (assuming that the camera is in focus) depends on whether either the subject, the camera, or both, move (even slightly) during the time that the shutter is open. So, the shorter that time, the less likely it is for a photo to blur. Indoors without flash, usually the shutter has to be open for a considerably longer time than it would be outside in direct sunlight, for example. Just as an example, where you might shoot a photo of a person at ~1/750 of a second outside, inside under tungsten lighting, you might be shooting at ~1/30 of a second, 25 times slower than outside. So there's lots more opportunity for movement to occur while the shutter is open. How can you minimize the "open time?" You can increase aperture to maximum (lowest number, e.g., f2.8); you can increase ISO to maximum (ISO 400, e.g., at the risk of increasing photo noise). If you're a very steady-handed person, and you practice with your grip and shooting technique, you may well be able to take sharp shots without a tripod, maybe not every time, but by taking multiple shots of something, you'll come away with a few keepers for your troubles. One way I'd suggest, for your camera, would be to use the optical viewfinder for indoor shots, which will put the camera up against your face for additional stability. Also note that your blurring will increase at longer focal lengths (more telephoto), which will magnify motion, made worse by the fact that the minimum lens aperture gets smaller (f4.9) at the longest zoom.
I hope that was helpful?

Stenton
11-05-2004, 08:46 AM
Now I get it. Thanks alot! Your reply was very helpful to me.

humara
12-03-2004, 05:26 PM
The new indoor shooting mode on the sd200/300 is great. it will adjust exposure and iso settings before relying on the flash. you can also turn the flash off completely in this mode.

you can also use the manual mode and set the iso to 400. that is a big help.

another big tip is to set the auto timer to 2 seconds. much of the blur is from the slight motion when depressing the shutter button.

hold the camera like a nerd. the picture in the manual on how to hold the camera to reduce shake really does work. you do end up looking kind of dorky.

i generally try to never use a flash while shooting people in low light. the light it too limited and too harsh. people look bad.

in a way, the soft focus helps make people look better :)

also the manual adjustment for exposure also helps quite a bit.