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Stoller
03-23-2006, 05:59 PM
Iím trying to setup to take portraits of our two black dogs. I picked out some red material for the background. I had heard if you donít use a flash you have better luck with animals. Setting up lighting with main light, hair light and background light works better for dogs because the flash tends to bother dogs and they wonít stay. The problem is the subject turns red. You can see below the first shot is with no flash of black stuffed animal. The second shot is with a flash. Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?
10514
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Norm in Fujino
03-23-2006, 08:00 PM
Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?

My guess is that your D50 is mistaking the color temperature (white balance) since you have almost no white in the image. Try doing a custom white balance, or set the color temperature manually to the temperature of the lighting (for incandescent, around 3000 should work).

Stoller
03-24-2006, 05:30 AM
That makes since. I will try different what balance settings this weekend and see what happens. Thanks

D70FAN
03-24-2006, 05:41 AM
I’m trying to setup to take portraits of our two black dogs. I picked out some red material for the background. I had heard if you don’t use a flash you have better luck with animals. Setting up lighting with main light, hair light and background light works better for dogs because the flash tends to bother dogs and they won’t stay. The problem is the subject turns red. You can see below the first shot is with no flash of black stuffed animal. The second shot is with a flash. Any ideas on what I'm doing wrong?


You need to set the white balance to match the lighting (incandescent, fourescent, etc.).

As a side note: Why are you shooting in reduced resolution (medium)? You bought a 6MP camera... might as well use all 6MP (instead of 3MP).;)

rawpaw18
03-24-2006, 06:31 AM
I will definitely agree with the previous posts. I have found on my D50 that for interior shots without flash you can not use auto wb, the red tones are always brought out. Some greens will turn brownish and if you have a lot of naural wood tones, well you might as well make it sepia shot.

Stoller
03-25-2006, 03:57 AM
As a side note: Why are you shooting in reduced resolution (medium)? You bought a 6MP camera... might as well use all 6MP (instead of 3MP).;)

Why take pictures in full resolution if I know I am going to post them on this message board and have to reduce the resolution even more? In fact 99% of of the pictures I take are for web publishing business so I rarely shot high resolution. I bought an SLR camera for shutter speed, aperture adjusting and the ability to attach high power/high speed flash.;)

Stoller
03-25-2006, 07:06 AM
Thank you guys for your advice. I played with some settings today. I learned I should have stepped up and bought a D70. White balance and ISO setting is limited with the D50. Two friends have D70's, lots of options the D50 does not have. With the D50 white balance is limited to option modes, use picture stored on camera or preset by placing a white object or 18% diffusion panel in the lighting used to take picture and allowing the camera to take a reading prior to the picture and storing the value. There are no options to manually set it as Norm suggested...I should also note ISO can only be set to 200, 400, 800, 1600...:(

So if your thinking of buying a D50 there are two big reasons to save up a little more and get the D70!!!

I took some pictures using incandescent and preset modes. They are better than the first non-flash picture I posted but still not what I consider good. I also feel my hardware store clamp lights are not providing enough light because I had to crank the ISO up and slow the shutter speed down. Infact I think the shutter speed would be to slow for taking portraits of dogs. I also think a more neutral background would help to.

Anyway this is all a great educational experience for me. :rolleyes:
Here are two sample shots with shooting data, sorry George I did not use my camera full resolution...;)

http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/test 009.jpg
http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/9_specs.gif

http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/test 008.jpg
http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/8_specs.gif

Prospero
03-25-2006, 07:31 AM
The pictures look better than the first one, but I think there's room for improvement.
If you use the RAW mode of the camera you can shoot your photograph in any mode you like and adjust it on the computer, for instance with Nikon Capture. There are several advantages. First of all, you do not have to worry about white-balance when you shoot the picture. Secondly, with Nikon Capture you can adjust the white-balance more accurately. There are more presets you can choose from and you can finetune the whitebalance.
To get faster shutterspeeds, you may have to consider a faster lens. From what I hear the Nikkor 50 f/1.8 seems to be excellent.
By the way, if you use Auto-iso your camera may chose to use values other than those you just mentioned.

Stoller
03-25-2006, 10:01 AM
One more picture, Best Results.

Backing up to use ceiling bounce flash with SB800 and defusser. Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8.

I'm happy with this shot. I'll just have to get my dogs use to the flash.


If you use the RAW mode of the camera you can shoot your photograph in any mode you like and adjust it on the computer, for instance with Nikon Capture. There are several advantages. First of all, you do not have to worry about white-balance when you shoot the picture. Secondly, with Nikon Capture you can adjust the white-balance more accurately. There are more presets you can choose from and you can finetune the whitebalance.


I have Nikon Capture but rarely use to edit pictures or white balance. I perfer to get the settings correct when the shot is taken to avoid post editing as I feel most photographers perfer.


To get faster shutterspeeds, you may have to consider a faster lens. From what I hear the Nikkor 50 f/1.8 seems to be excellent.


Why would I want a faster shutter speed when I stated I had to slow the shutter speed down? I also think the Nikkor 50 f/1.4 is a better lens than the 1.8 and the price reflects that.


By the way, if you use Auto-iso your camera may chose to use values other than those you just mentioned

With all the pictures I have taken with my D50 with the ISO set to auto I have only seen it use the settings I stated and almost always 200 or 400. I would love to be able to drop the ISO to 100 and do a 1-3 second exposure for some scenic shots. I have seen wonderful scenic shots taken by a D70 with long exposure times.

http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/test.jpg
http://mlrc.us/mnt/dcresource/test_spec.gif

Prospero
03-25-2006, 03:18 PM
Why would I want a faster shutter speed when I stated I had to slow the shutter speed down? I also think the Nikkor 50 f/1.4 is a better lens than the 1.8 and the price reflects that.


Larger appertures allow for faster shutterspeeds. You stated that you thought the shutterspeeds were not fast enough for shooting dogs. A faster lens, one that allows for a larger apperture than the kitlens you used with the other shot, will allow you to increase your shutterspeed making it fast enough for shooting dogs.
About the lens, I have heard many say that the f/1.8 is a very good lens, even better than the f/1.4, despite the difference in price.

That last picture is great, by the way. Using the flash in this case gives indeed the best result.

erichlund
03-25-2006, 05:11 PM
OK. Here's a CHEAP solution to your white balance issue. Go buy a can of pringles. Throw the nasty pringles (OK, that part's my opinion) away, but keep the cap. Use some medium fine sandpaper to generally scuff it up on both sides. Dust it off (don't want to get plastic dust on your lens). Now, from the place where you are going to take the photo, point your camera back to the light source and take a preset white balance, holding the pringles cap over your lens. Using flash? Have a helper hold the flash and trigger it just after you release the shutter for the preset white balance. Save this preset white balance and select it as your white balance to use after you get your subject to pose.

Even better, using bounce flash? point your camera at the ceiling and take the preset white balance with the flash pointing at the same spot on the ceiling. Don't point at other lights, if there are any about.

As an alternative, you could go out and spend lots of money on an ExpoDisc. I have one, and it works great. However, I don't think Pringles are up to $125 a can yet. ;)