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NCOUTDOORS
02-16-2006, 07:18 AM
I have several landscape photos that I took last fall and now I'm having trouble getting them to print without looking grainy or pixelated. I'm using a kodak dx7590 that offers several different settings for taking pictures and a epson r320 6 color printer. I am not sure what I'm doing wrong to cause my pictures to come out the way they do. I guess I need advice on setting the camera for landscape situations (ex. aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings, etc....) I attached a photo of how one of the pictures turned out. Any feedback is helpful, thanks :confused:

sherlock
02-16-2006, 11:45 AM
Hey,

Well landscape photography is my main passion so I'll try to help you out.

First off the 'graininess' you see in your photos might be the result of using a high ISO setting (ie 200+) so when shooting landscapes keep the ISO as low as it will go. Tripods are usually a must with landscapes so the shutter speeds/handholding shouldn't be a problem.

As for the aperture settings, landscapes (ususally) are all about depth of field, or how much of the picture looks in focus (although only one point is, but that's more complicated). To get all the image in focus use the largest f/ number your camera offers which is usually around f/8 on compact digicams. The photo I've attatched was shot at f/16 on an SLR to demonstrate how depth of field works (see how both the dock and bridge are in focus? ;) ).

But in the end its all about experimentation with settings to see what comes out best, and with digital cameras this is even easier with the instant feeback.

Hope all of this helped!

BTW: That photo you posted is very good! You really captured the light well. :) May I ask where you took it?



Andrew

NCOUTDOORS
02-16-2006, 12:56 PM
Thanks for the help and advice, I'll give it a try and I'm also going to double check my histogram settings for my other pictures I took that day. The picture posted was taken from shortoff mountain looking up the linville gorge in NC. Thanks again:)

NCOUTDOORS
02-17-2006, 05:44 AM
Which is better for shooting landscapes like the one I posted above, using the aperture, shutter, manual features, or using the landscape setting:confused: Thanks for the help.

GabOrcinus
02-17-2006, 06:01 AM
Which is better for shooting landscapes like the one I posted above, using the aperture, shutter, manual features, or using the landscape setting:confused: Thanks for the help.
Aperture: You should use the highest number (>F8) to have everything in focus, unless you don't want that.

Shutter: Works hand in hand with the aperture. The bigger the aperture value, the slower the shutter speed.

Manual features: Both of the above are manual features. Another variable is ISO, which I'd keep below 200 on P&S cameras to avoid noise.

The landscape setting: When you use the camera's auto settings, not only do you lose creative liberties, but you don't know what the camera is going to think a good exposure is.

Learning the basics of photography is very simple and there are hundreds of sites on the web. Take a little time to learn them and you'll be able to take more advantage of your camera.

NCOUTDOORS
02-17-2006, 07:59 AM
Hey thanks for the knowledge and helping me understand how to apply the different camera settings. Nice shots in your gallery. Thanks again:)

GabOrcinus
02-17-2006, 08:04 AM
Hey thanks for the knowledge and helping me understand how to apply the different camera settings. Nice shots in your gallery. Thanks again:)
You're welcome, and thanks for the compliment. :)

Coltess
02-18-2006, 10:03 AM
I have a somewhat silly question for NCoutdoors.
What is the resolution of your pictures and what size are you printing them at?

NCOUTDOORS
02-20-2006, 07:24 AM
I'm using the 5 mega pixel setting with 2576 x 1932 resolution. I'm wanting to printing 5 x 7 or 8 x 10. ;)