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capedeci
02-12-2006, 07:05 AM
Hi seniors.
Can you help me giving some info on cleaning sensor?

In my country, I cant get the copper hill equipment. I also don't know what is a pec pad.

I heard using a blower will invite more dust (have tried, and its true). Is there specific type of blower that can do better?

The only sensor cleaning equipmet available here is the Visible Dust sensor brush, which is extremely expensive here ($200 for a brush and few ml of liquid?????????:confused: )

Thanks
P.s.IM NOT TRYING TO FLAME!!!!!

ktixx
02-12-2006, 09:37 AM
What Country are you from?
The "copperhill" method is definitley one of the best cleaning methods, however it is just a name and you can probably purchase all the chemicals separately from other stores in your country. All you need is the following:
1) Methyl Alcohol
2) Pec Pads (These are ultra soft, steril pads that do not leave lint or any residue behind when used and will not scratch your sensor glass)
3) a spatula cut to size (depending on your sensor size)

Again, I don't know what country you are from but here is a link to the European version of the "copperhill" method (http://chili-pix.ch/shop/product_info.php?products_id=28&osCsid=9e89f14bbb4002bba8ab1d432367c985). In addition, here is the kit that is labled as "Available Everywhere" (http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/image/44822724) - but you would still have to purchase the Methyl Alcohol Separately.
Good Luck
Ken

capedeci
02-12-2006, 10:11 AM
I'm from Indonesia, in south east Asia.

Where can I buy these items (the alcohol and the pec pad)?

In chemical shop, or in drug stores?

And I don't know a spatula is cuttable? Are we talking about same thing? I know it as a cooking utensil.

I'm really afraid that I'll damage the sensor.

ktixx
02-12-2006, 03:18 PM
First of all you don't actually clean the "sensor" you clean a piece of glass that covers the sensor. So Don't worry about damaging your sensor. This method of sensor cleaning is VERY safe and it so much better than the 'blowing' method (this puts more dust into your camera) and is better than dry (this can scratch your sensor). The problem that you can have would be caused by using products not designed for cleaning sensors. If you use cloths that have a form of oil on them, or a chemical that leaves a residue you can make your images blurry (It can usually be fixed by properly cleaning). When you purchase the chemicals/equipment just make sure that you purchase chemicals that are meant for this type of cleaning. I would suggest the links above that I gave you. The chemical that you need is called Methly Alchohol and is sold under the Eclipse Label. Go online and do some research and I am sure you can find this chemical somewhere. Do not use any kind of rubbing alchohol as this could leave a residue. Also you want to use PEC pads (you should have no problem getting these) and you want a spatula (yes the kind used for cooking) that is cut to size. The spatula you should have no problem getting either. The only product difficult to get is the Eclipse solution as it cannot be air mailed. Order the Pec pads and the spatula (for your specific Camera) from Copperhill (http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning) and order the eclipse/methly alchohol from a local camera shop or somewhere on the Web that will send it to you.
Good Luck
Ken

capedeci
02-12-2006, 06:45 PM
thank you, but my problem is nobody wants to accept a credit card from my country, not even paypal :(

ktixx
02-14-2006, 09:31 PM
thank you, but my problem is nobody wants to accept a credit card from my country, not even paypal :(
It seems kind of odd that no one would accept your credit card or paypal, as both are secured forms of payment. I would suggest contacting customer service for where you tried to purchase the products and asking them why they will not accept your payment. As long as your credit card has a Visa/Mastercard/AMEX or Discover logo it should be accepted and if your paypal account is secured then their should be no problem with that payment method either.
Ken

kantoine
03-04-2006, 12:28 AM
Hi seniors.
Can you help me giving some info on cleaning sensor?

In my country, I cant get the copper hill equipment. I also don't know what is a pec pad.

I heard using a blower will invite more dust (have tried, and its true). Is there specific type of blower that can do better?

The only sensor cleaning equipmet available here is the Visible Dust sensor brush, which is extremely expensive here ($200 for a brush and few ml of liquid?????????:confused: )

Thanks
P.s.IM NOT TRYING TO FLAME!!!!!



Go to the following Site in Australia http://www.qualitycamera.com.au you will see the copphill for sale and costs.


Also before doing this go to this site which explains what you need to do.
http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/index.html

Pave
03-07-2006, 12:38 AM
Just a little warning: Methyl alcohol is a dangerous poison. You don't even need to drink it. It is sufficient to breath its vapours or let it get in contact with your skin. So if you would use it, I suggest you got some gloves and facecloth. Otherwise it could cause irreversible paralysis of the optic nerve and consequently blindness. This happens only if you get in contact with massive doses, but I thought you should know.
And if the worst happened and you (or anyone else) saw the world going black, drink HUGE amount of alcohol (like whiskey, vodka or such stuff). I'm not kidding. Methyl alcohole is not dangerous in its pure form. Dangerous is what enzymes in our body do with it. They change it to formaldehyde which is poisonous. But the enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase) which is responsible for handling all types of alcohole has higher affinity to ethyl alcohol (this means to already mentioned whiskey etc.) and so if you dring large amount of it the alcohol dehydrogenase would begin to handle ethanol and methanol would get out of your body unchanged. This only works if you got the ethanol in your body perorally. If you began to loose your sight after breathing the vapours of metanol you could go to hospital but there is no much they would be able to do. You would have to stay at rest for a while and wait. In these mild cases the paralysis is usually only partial and temporary and to be cured it requires rest for the eyes.
Sorry to bother with all this stuff but as I said above, I think it is usefull to know, what the things you handle could to to you....

ktixx
03-07-2006, 05:56 AM
Pave,
You seem to know quite a lot about chemicals? are you a scentist? Dr.? Although certainly a valid point, the amount of methly that you actually use is so minute that I doubt anything could happen. Literally to clean your sensor you use 2 tiny drops and the bottle has a built in dropper, so the vapors can't easily escape. In any case, thanks for the warning, I was certainly unaware that methly alchohol was that dangerous! :eek:
Ken

Prospero
03-07-2006, 11:51 AM
Just a little warning: Methyl alcohol is a dangerous poison. You don't even need to drink it. It is sufficient to breath its vapours or let it get in contact with your skin. So if you would use it, I suggest you got some gloves and facecloth. Otherwise it could cause irreversible paralysis of the optic nerve and consequently blindness. This happens only if you get in contact with massive doses, but I thought you should know.
And if the worst happened and you (or anyone else) saw the world going black, drink HUGE amount of alcohol (like whiskey, vodka or such stuff). I'm not kidding. Methyl alcohole is not dangerous in its pure form. Dangerous is what enzymes in our body do with it. They change it to formaldehyde which is poisonous. But the enzyme (alcohol dehydrogenase) which is responsible for handling all types of alcohole has higher affinity to ethyl alcohol (this means to already mentioned whiskey etc.) and so if you dring large amount of it the alcohol dehydrogenase would begin to handle ethanol and methanol would get out of your body unchanged. This only works if you got the ethanol in your body perorally. If you began to loose your sight after breathing the vapours of metanol you could go to hospital but there is no much they would be able to do. You would have to stay at rest for a while and wait. In these mild cases the paralysis is usually only partial and temporary and to be cured it requires rest for the eyes.
Sorry to bother with all this stuff but as I said above, I think it is usefull to know, what the things you handle could to to you....

That just makes me feel lucky I can still see :o. Last year I did we had to do an experiment at school for physics. We could decide on the topic ourselves. I decided to investigate the surface tension of a liquid at various temperatures. The point of the experiment was to find a clear relationship between the variables surface tension and temperature. After looking on the internet I couldn't find this relationship for water, but I could find it for ethanol alcohol, the most common kind of alcohol.
Of course I asked the physics teacher about this, and he said it was no problem. So I started doing the experiment. After doing the experiment for like 4 hours, and heating the alcohol to temperatures close to its boiling point, another teacher approached us saying that there was 5% methanol in the liquid. So for four hours we had been breathing in the toxic fumes of methanol :(. That just made me wonder why my physics teacher hadn't told that in the first place :mad:.
Anyway, I suppose I was lucky, I didn't suffer from any of the symptons of intoxication I read on the internet later. Only a bit of headache, but I suppose that could have been the result of the alcohol fumes just the same.

Pave
03-07-2006, 11:40 PM
That just makes me feel lucky I can still see :o. Last year I did we had to do an experiment at school for physics. We could decide on the topic ourselves. I decided to investigate the surface tension of a liquid at various temperatures. The point of the experiment was to find a clear relationship between the variables surface tension and temperature. After looking on the internet I couldn't find this relationship for water, but I could find it for ethanol alcohol, the most common kind of alcohol.
Of course I asked the physics teacher about this, and he said it was no problem. So I started doing the experiment. After doing the experiment for like 4 hours, and heating the alcohol to temperatures close to its boiling point, another teacher approached us saying that there was 5% methanol in the liquid. So for four hours we had been breathing in the toxic fumes of methanol :(. That just made me wonder why my physics teacher hadn't told that in the first place :mad:.
Anyway, I suppose I was lucky, I didn't suffer from any of the symptons of intoxication I read on the internet later. Only a bit of headache, but I suppose that could have been the result of the alcohol fumes just the same.

:eek: Whoa...I'm not sure how much vapours you'd have to breath in to suffer from any of the symptoms, but I've heard about two students who were doing their dissertation (in chemistry) on something and it required usage of methanol. After some time they realized that everything around them was unusually grey and they had to spend following week in a darkened room watching the ceilling. They are OK now, but let it be a warning for all of us who handle stuff like this. (I personaly have done anything with it only once, and don't exactly look forward to doing anything with it again.)
Anyway, your physics teacher is pretty irresponsible, I'd say. The amout was not too great (5% is not too much) but I wouldn't dare to risk it if I were him. By the way, does this teacher have any education in chemistry?

Prospero
03-08-2006, 06:28 AM
The teacher has studied both physics and chemistry at university he once told us. He is brilliant in both subjects, but he has lost all his sanity. He is indeed pretty irresponsible.

rdegro
03-25-2006, 09:28 PM
Hi seniors.
Can you help me giving some info on cleaning sensor?

In my country, I cant get the copper hill equipment. I also don't know what is a pec pad.

I heard using a blower will invite more dust (have tried, and its true). Is there specific type of blower that can do better?

The only sensor cleaning equipmet available here is the Visible Dust sensor brush, which is extremely expensive here ($200 for a brush and few ml of liquid?????????:confused: )

Thanks
P.s.IM NOT TRYING TO FLAME!!!!!

Go to this link, it's a wealth of information.

http://www.cleaningdigitalcameras.com/

I think you'll get insight here, but as to where to buy supplies in your area?????

You may be able to get medical grade methanol which is what is in the kit. As a side note; I buy methanol by the 55 gallon drum for racing fuel but it's nowhere near the purity required in sensor cleaning, I was able to find a source that I convinced to ship a cleaning kit.

:D