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tim11
01-16-2006, 06:47 PM
Does anyone have any links to free tips and techniques on Flash Photography? Thanks in advance.

cdifoto
01-16-2006, 07:41 PM
Does anyone have any links to free tips and techniques on Flash Photography? Thanks in advance.

Google is our friend.

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=flash+photography&btnG=Google+Search

tim11
01-16-2006, 09:27 PM
I did googled before posting the thread, but you know..., all things containing the word FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY came up. I wonder if anyone has a tried and true link?
Thanks all the same CDI-BUY.

cdifoto
01-16-2006, 09:39 PM
I did googled before posting the thread, but you know..., all things containing the word FLASH PHOTOGRAPHY came up. I wonder if anyone has a tried and true link?
Thanks all the same CDI-BUY.

The 2nd link (http://www.vividlight.com/articles/611.htm) gives a nice little brief tutorial. Anything beyond that requires experimentation and practice. This one (http://www.apogeephoto.com/may2004/jaltengarten5_2004.shtml) also seemed kinda decent.

You can go one step further and google for your particular flash. For my Canon EOS system there are a lot of good tutorials. Since I have no idea what you're using, I can't do the search for you.

tim11
01-16-2006, 10:04 PM
I want to widen my photography knowledge and am thinking of buying a Sunpak 383 to put on FZ20 in the next few days, so I just want to have some idea beforehand. I'd like to know the techniques, bounce flash, reflector card; etc. There is a thread on flash in Pana forum but not exactly to my need as they only discussed the makes and models.
Thanks again for the links. I found the first but not the 2nd.

aparmley
01-20-2006, 07:18 PM
I was just going to start this thread if it was not already going. I want to add few links, Jamie, I will add yours because I think it was very useful and I kinda want to get everything in one place here, I hope you don't mind.

Here are two detailed and interesting links. The first is very detailed so be warned:

http://photonotes.org/articles/eos-flash/

Here is Jamies link he posted in the DSLR Chat forum:
http://www.planetneil.com/faq/flash-techniques.html

Hopefully we can get some really good discussions going about Flash photography that we all can learn and improve from. . . so lets have it. . .

I personally identified with the link Jamie supplied for us because the gentleman came right out and said he abhores flash shadows. . . Him and I both, I can't stand them, I'd much prefer working with ambient light than seeing a poorly executed flash photo. His photos were really impressive. I just can't seem to wrap my head around some techniques, its my goal this weekend to work on this so I can pin point the areas in which I am struggling, I will post back here some samples and my questions. I hope others beat me to it as I would like to see a lot of contributions here. I know we all have questions or we have issues with perfecting the way we use flash. . . Ask away. . .

tim11
01-21-2006, 06:21 PM
Aparmley, if people in general like flash shadows, that will make flash photography much more easier. Like you, I hate that harsh shadow behind the subject when flash is used.
I bought a flash and am now trying different methods to see the effects. Thanks goodness for digital cameras - I can see the results instantly! I am confident I will be ready to cover an important function for a relative in March :). And I am amazed how much difference an external flash can make in term of picture quality!!! From now on, if a camera has no hot-shoe, it will be a no-buy for me.
Thanks for the links. I am reading them now so to gain knowledge for my DSLR of the future.

tim11
02-05-2006, 03:38 PM
Hello, I'm back for more. :D
From my recent experiment, the photos I like most are those taken with bounced flash from the ceiling. When I bounce it off the wall there are still flash shadow on most of the photos - either shadows or the face is half dark.
I have been reading some links on the internet regarding flash diffuser and flash bouncer/deflector. So before I rush out to buy anymore gadgets and get talked into buying unecesarry stuff by the salesperson, I would like to a couple of questions.
Can someone explain in simple term what kind of result a flash diffuser can give?
For higher ceiling that my flash unit can't reach, will the flash bouncer give the same result? And what if I hold the camera vertically? My main aim is to eliminate harsh flash shadow behind the objects.
Thanks everyone for previous feedbacks and for any replies in advance.

cdifoto
02-05-2006, 03:58 PM
Hello, I'm back for more. :D
From my recent experiment, the photos I like most are those taken with bounced flash from the ceiling. When I bounce it off the wall there are still flash shadow on most of the photos - either shadows or the face is half dark.
I have been reading some links on the internet regarding flash diffuser and flash bouncer/deflector. So before I rush out to buy anymore gadgets and get talked into buying unecesarry stuff by the salesperson, I would like to a couple of questions.
Can someone explain in simple term what kind of result a flash diffuser can give?
For higher ceiling that my flash unit can't reach, will the flash bouncer give the same result? And what if I hold the camera vertically? My main aim is to eliminate harsh flash shadow behind the objects.
Thanks everyone for previous feedbacks and for any replies in advance.

Your best results (for the most part) will come from bouncing off of where the wall and ceiling meet, usually behind you or slightly behind and to the right or left. That broadens the light the most to illuminate the entire room. That's just my opinion though. You can do other things for creative/artistic purposes and control your shadows accordingly.

Diffusers and bouncers/reflectors do all sorts of things, depending how they are designed. Some help throw light forward while most is being bounce off the ceiling (Stofen Omnibounce @ 45 degree bounce). Others let most of the light go straight up and send some forward (Lumiquest 80/20), while others are meant to soften straight-ahead shooting (Lumiquest Softbox & Softbox II). All depends what you want to achieve. There is no one size fits all solution.

If you want to hold the camera vertically and get no shadows, you'll want to invest in a flash bracket (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?A=search&Q=&a=348_2941&mnp=0.0&mxp=0.0&shs=&ci=653&ac=&Submit.x=13&Submit.y=10&Submit=Go). They keep your flash above the lens - essential to throw the shadows down to the floor rather than off to the side.

tim11
02-05-2006, 04:58 PM
Your best results (for the most part) will come from bouncing off of where the wall and ceiling meet, usually behind you or slightly behind and to the right or left. That broadens the light the most to illuminate the entire room.
Behind ME - the photographer? Just to confirm. I can visualise you refer to a small room or studio, but what if the place is a wedding reception? What is the best technique and/or gadget to eliminate shadows?



If you want to hold the camera vertically and get no shadows, you'll want to invest in a flash bracket (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?A=search&Q=&a=348_2941&mnp=0.0&mxp=0.0&shs=&ci=653&ac=&Submit.x=13&Submit.y=10&Submit=Go). They keep your flash above the lens - essential to throw the shadows down to the floor rather than off to the side.
So even if I find a suitable flash deflector, I also should need a bracket to shoot vertical effectively?
I am asked to help taking photos at a reception in March and I want to give the couple the best possible.
Thanks again for your help.

cdifoto
02-05-2006, 05:38 PM
In a large-ish room, with a reasonable ceiling, I would use a Stofen Omnibounce and set my flash head at a 45 degree bounce. That method would allow a bounce as well as forward light cast.

In smaller rooms, bounce behind you like I mentioned because it will turn the wall/ceiling into a broad light source, illuminating the room for your subject.

The whole idea is to get a broad soft light source on your subject. How that's done depends on the conditions.

You'll need a bracket for vertical shots. You gotta get the flash above the lens.

tim11
02-08-2006, 05:49 AM
CDi-buy, as you mentioned I find that bouncing off of where the wall and ceiling meet give very good result - wherever the ceiling is not too high.
FZ20 doesn't have a dedicate flash and most are just guess work - which make learning more challenging and fun.
I have one more question (for now).
For where I'm not too confident that the ceiling is low enough for bounce, what sort of reflector will eliminate (or minimise) flash shadow? Is that the Stofen Omnibounce?


In a large-ish room, with a reasonable ceiling, I would use a Stofen Omnibounce and set my flash head at a 45 degree bounce. That method would allow a bounce as well as forward light cast.

How high would you consider by REASONABLE?
Thanks.

cdifoto
02-08-2006, 06:10 AM
CDi-buy, as you mentioned I find that bouncing off of where the wall and ceiling meet give very good result - wherever the ceiling is not too high.
FZ20 doesn't have a dedicate flash and most are just guess work - which make learning more challenging and fun.
I have one more question (for now).
For where I'm not too confident that the ceiling is low enough for bounce, what sort of reflector will eliminate (or minimise) flash shadow? Is that the Stofen Omnibounce?

The Stofen isn't a reflector. If your ceilings are really high you might just have to get an on flash softbox (look on Lumiquest.com ...they have 2 sizes) and live with some shadows.



How high would you consider by REASONABLE?
Thanks.

That really depends how powerful your flash is.