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cosmo
01-15-2006, 10:47 AM
Would a forum member explain in a step by step method, the procedure for metering to determine aperture and shutter speed, to shoot in M mode, using a portrait or landscape situation as an example. Thx.

backstageben
01-16-2006, 11:30 PM
what type of meter? TTL, Spot? need more to go on here.

jamison55
01-17-2006, 03:33 AM
Depends upon what type of camera you have. Let's assume that it is one with a meter that you can view. All DSLR's have a meter you can see through the viewfinder that looks like this (+2..+1..0..-1..-2). That's your exposure indicator. As long as your exposure is near the 0, the exposure is correct.

But where do you begin? How about the TNT "Sunny 16" rule:

1) Set your shutter speed to match your ISO setting (i.e. ISO200 = 1/200 SS)

2) If it's a bright sunny day, set your aperture to f16; slighty overcast, f11; overcast, f8; very overcast, f5.6, etc.

With the sunny 16 rule you just have to watch your eposure meter to make sure it's not straying towards the +2 or -2 regions. If it is, adjust your aperture or SS to compensate.

Of course, if your camera is set to spot meter, your meter readigs might not be indicative of the overall scene exposure. Your camera manual should help determine which metering modes are available.

cosmo
01-18-2006, 04:19 AM
Depends upon what type of camera you have. Let's assume that it is one with a meter that you can view. All DSLR's have a meter you can see through the viewfinder that looks like this (+2..+1..0..-1..-2). That's your exposure indicator. As long as your exposure is near the 0, the exposure is correct.

But where do you begin? How about the TNT "Sunny 16" rule:

1) Set your shutter speed to match your ISO setting (i.e. ISO200 = 1/200 SS)

2) If it's a bright sunny day, set your aperture to f16; slighty overcast, f11; overcast, f8; very overcast, f5.6, etc.

With the sunny 16 rule you just have to watch your eposure meter to make sure it's not straying towards the +2 or -2 regions. If it is, adjust your aperture or SS to compensate.

Of course, if your camera is set to spot meter, your meter readigs might not be indicative of the overall scene exposure. Your camera manual should help determine which metering modes are available.


Jamison: Thanks much for explaining in a manner that even I can understand. I do have a camera that has a exposure indicator (Dreb)

As an example, let me describe this sunset scene. Its near a lake. Around 5.30PM, the setting sun and sky looks orangish. The orange color reflects in the lake water. There are trees around the lake edge.

Goal: I want to capture the orange reflection in the water as the highlight in the picture.

Method: To do this, in Tv Mode, I set ISO 100, a SS (1/125), set evaluative metering, take a aperture reading after focusing on the orangish reflection, since this is the highlight. I make a note of the SS 1/125 and the aperture I just saw through the viewfinder.

I now recompose, after changing to M Mode, the scene with the setting sun, trees and water using the determined SS and aperture and shoot. I compensate if necessary to get standard exposure. Comments about this method, please.

Darth_furious
01-23-2006, 12:32 AM
in trickier situations, I use exposure bracketing on my 350D. Or I shoot in Raw and try to adjust later

cosmo
01-23-2006, 10:27 AM
in trickier situations, I use exposure bracketing on my 350D. Or I shoot in Raw and try to adjust later

Good suggestion, furious darth.

Whats the proper way to use the Through The Lens meter, to be able to shoot in manual mode?

rjromero10
01-24-2006, 02:40 PM
Jamison: Thanks much for explaining in a manner that even I can understand. I do have a camera that has a exposure indicator (Dreb)

As an example, let me describe this sunset scene. Its near a lake. Around 5.30PM, the setting sun and sky looks orangish. The orange color reflects in the lake water. There are trees around the lake edge.

Goal: I want to capture the orange reflection in the water as the highlight in the picture.

Method: To do this, in Tv Mode, I set ISO 100, a SS (1/125), set evaluative metering, take a aperture reading after focusing on the orangish reflection, since this is the highlight. I make a note of the SS 1/125 and the aperture I just saw through the viewfinder.

I now recompose, after changing to M Mode, the scene with the setting sun, trees and water using the determined SS and aperture and shoot. I compensate if necessary to get standard exposure. Comments about this method, please.

I am not sure but I think if you do this and the sunset is still kind of bright the sky will be over-exposed. Am I correct? What about a graduated ND Filter? Somebody else?