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View Full Version : Still blurring picture ...why?



Mike C.
10-11-2004, 03:43 PM
Hi,

Still have only had time to "play" with my FZ20. Most pictures come out wonderful!

I still don't have the hang of taking pictures of moving objects.

I have been trying to catch my dogs while running but I keep getting blurry pictures.

I tried setting it to "sports" scene . Still no luck.

Today I finally got a good sunny day to try the camera. Still no luck. I tried it in bust mode .. blurred.

It is obviouly something I am doing wrong. Stabilization I leave on mode 2.

Should I change the ISO from 100 to 400?

Should I forget about the "sports" mode and just set the lens wide open (2.8) or just set the shutter faster and if I get a dark picture lighten it up later or ???

I guess I should ask also what is considered a "long exposure" when hand holding a camera (I admit I'm not very steady)?

Thanks ..... Mike :)

John_Reed
10-11-2004, 04:33 PM
Hi,

Still have only had time to "play" with my FZ20. Most pictures come out wonderful!

I still don't have the hang of taking pictures of moving objects.

I have been trying to catch my dogs while running but I keep getting blurry pictures.

I tried setting it to "sports" scene . Still no luck.

Today I finally got a good sunny day to try the camera. Still no luck. I tried it in bust mode .. blurred.

It is obviouly something I am doing wrong. Stabilization I leave on mode 2.

Should I change the ISO from 100 to 400?

Should I forget about the "sports" mode and just set the lens wide open (2.8) or just set the shutter faster and if I get a dark picture lighten it up later or ???

I guess I should ask also what is considered a "long exposure" when hand holding a camera (I admit I'm not very steady)?

Thanks ..... Mike :)The Image Stabilizer in the Panasonic helps reduce only one kind of blur - camera motion. If your subject is moving while the shutter is open, the resulting photo WILL be blurry. What can you do about that? Well, try for faster shutter speeds. This will usually be possible at highest ISO, maximum aperture. "Sports" mode tries to control the settings for maximum aperture, fastest shutter speed. Another thing you can do is try to follow the subject as it moves (either in O.I.S. Mode 2 and/or "Panning" mode) and depress the shutter button while keeping the camera moving with the subject. This works well if the subject's distance from the camera isn't changing too much during the shot interval, but if, for example, the dog is running right at you, it will be hard for the camera to stay in focus during the shot. Another way to freeze motion, if lighting permits, is to use flash, though this will probably be more effective at night than daytime. If all else fails, post a couple of photos and show us some examples. Good luck! :o

D70FAN
10-11-2004, 04:42 PM
The Image Stabilizer in the Panasonic helps reduce only one kind of blur - camera motion. If your subject is moving while the shutter is open, the resulting photo WILL be blurry. What can you do about that? Well, try for faster shutter speeds. This will usually be possible at highest ISO, maximum aperture. "Sports" mode tries to control the settings for maximum aperture, fastest shutter speed. Another thing you can do is try to follow the subject as it moves (either in O.I.S. Mode 2 and/or "Panning" mode) and depress the shutter button while keeping the camera moving with the subject. This works well if the subject's distance from the camera isn't changing too much during the shot interval, but if, for example, the dog is running right at you, it will be hard for the camera to stay in focus during the shot. Another way to freeze motion, if lighting permits, is to use flash, though this will probably be more effective at night than daytime. If all else fails, post a couple of photos and show us some examples. Good luck! :o

John, I thought that for moving objects, in bright daylight, it was better just to turn OIS off. Or is that just with a tripod? I would think that any shutter speed above about 1/200 wouldn't really require OIS, and for panning shots might get in the way.

Since I don't own one, it's just a thought.

John_Reed
10-11-2004, 05:10 PM
John, I thought that for moving objects, in bright daylight, it was better just to turn OIS off. Or is that just with a tripod? I would think that any shutter speed above about 1/200 wouldn't really require OIS, and for panning shots might get in the way.

Since I don't own one, it's just a thought.I don't think so, George. I always have OIS on (I never use a tripod, though, and some do recommend you turn OIS off if you are using one, hey why not?), except sometimes to try to capture flying birds and the like. I can show you an old photo in Jeff's early KM Z1 testing where he was actually getting "shooter" blur at 1/500. If you set the Panasonics to "Panning" mode, they actually turn off the horizontal component of OIS to let you more easily track the subject motion. The problem with dogs and athletes running with balls, etc., is that they don't just run in a straight line, so it's sometimes tough to get a jitter-free exposure no matter what you do. :p

D70FAN
10-11-2004, 07:59 PM
I don't think so, George. I always have OIS on (I never use a tripod, though, and some do recommend you turn OIS off if you are using one, hey why not?), except sometimes to try to capture flying birds and the like. I can show you an old photo in Jeff's early KM Z1 testing where he was actually getting "shooter" blur at 1/500. If you set the Panasonics to "Panning" mode, they actually turn off the horizontal component of OIS to let you more easily track the subject motion. The problem with dogs and athletes running with balls, etc., is that they don't just run in a straight line, so it's sometimes tough to get a jitter-free exposure no matter what you do. :p

Hmmm. I never seem to have that problem. Blurred background maybe, but never the subject. Even when the object is heading my way.

I'll have to check this out with a VR lens and see what happens. Thanks!

John_Reed
10-11-2004, 09:19 PM
Hmmm. I never seem to have that problem. Blurred background maybe, but never the subject. Even when the object is heading my way.

I'll have to check this out with a VR lens and see what happens. Thanks!I may be wrong about the "blurring while moving towards" thing. I was tracking some flying birds the other day, and I noticed that with my FZ10's shutter button half-depressed, the bird seemed to stay in focus even though it was flying in a direction towards the camera. You'd have a definite advantage with the D70 compared to the FZ10 with respect to shutter lag, for sure. What is the D70 shutter lag supposed to be?

judge9847
10-12-2004, 05:43 AM
I don't think so, George. I always have OIS on (I never use a tripod, though, and some do recommend you turn OIS off if you are using one, hey why not?), except sometimes to try to capture flying birds and the like. I can show you an old photo in Jeff's early KM Z1 testing where he was actually getting "shooter" blur at 1/500. If you set the Panasonics to "Panning" mode, they actually turn off the horizontal component of OIS to let you more easily track the subject motion. The problem with dogs and athletes running with balls, etc., is that they don't just run in a straight line, so it's sometimes tough to get a jitter-free exposure no matter what you do. :p
Just to try and add to the debate, I've been experimenting with the OIS turned off and on (mode 2) and though I'm going to need to do some more I believe I've discovered that there are times for the OIS and times to do without it. The only way to decide when to use it or not is, I believe, through simple experience.

I went out last Sunday with a view to experimenting with the FZ10's panning mode with OIS on and off. About a mile away, on a very, very windy day, there were a couple of groups of people doing their thing with sand yacht racing and something which to me seemed really terrifying, sitting on a board with wheels being dragged along by a parachute in the wind!

The speeds the parachute guys get up to was stunning and I'm not exaggerating if I say that they comfortably touched 50mph and at times I'd guess even faster than that. They ripped past me and disappeared into the distance at breathtaking rates.

Anyway, here a couple of results. This first one was taken with OIS on in panning mode using AE and in burst mode. I was about 80 to 100 feet away from the guy and the focal length was 72mm. F8.0, 1/160 sec.
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/r.patterson4/DCRP/optsandsomething.jpg

The second one was taken about half hour later but I was closer to him and on the other side. OIS was off but still in panning mode, AE and burst mode. Focal length 65.2, F8.0, 1/250 sec.
http://homepage.ntlworld.com/r.patterson4/DCRP/optsandsomething01.jpg

Both were hand held and both have been heavily optimised (hence the noise) to post to this thread but for me, the second one is a "better" photograph in the sense that I believe the camera has done a better all round job with it.

I appreciate it's almost impossible to compare one image with another but there are others taken on the same day which seem to suggest that with OIS off, provided the shutter speed is reasonably quick, the results aren't bad at all. How I wish I could go back in time and repeat the second shot with OIS on ... :)