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AmyM
10-11-2004, 07:04 AM
Hello: I have never had a digital camera and have been doing all my research. I am planning on buying a Kodak -- one reason being the ability to shoot at any time, and fast speeds on shutter lag, etc. However, what is the difference between this fast speed and just using the burst mode in any other camera? Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks!

Amy

John_Reed
10-11-2004, 07:22 AM
Hello: I have never had a digital camera and have been doing all my research. I am planning on buying a Kodak -- one reason being the ability to shoot at any time, and fast speeds on shutter lag, etc. However, what is the difference between this fast speed and just using the burst mode in any other camera? Any insight would be appreciated. Thanks!

AmyI use a Panasonic FZ10, and I can tell you that burst mode is a very nice feature. Say for example, you're at a baseball game, and you want to catch a pitcher throwing a pitch, or a batter swinging at the ball. These things happen too quickly for you to react and squeeze off your shot at the instant they occur, but with burst mode (which takes 5 shots at 4 frames/second), you can start the sequence and just let it roll, rather like a movie at a low frame rate, but at full camera resolution. When I was in Hawai'i recently and I wanted to catch the "green flash" that happens when the sun is just setting, I trained my camera on the sun, and just as it dipped below the horizon, started a 5-shot burst. The "flash" showed up in 3 of the 5 shots, something I didn't even see with my naked eye. :o

AmyM
10-11-2004, 09:44 AM
Thanks, John. This is very helpful. One more question then: if you are doing something like watching a game or viewing wildlife, where you know you might miss shots, can you just leave a camera in burst mode? Why wouldn't you? I guess what I am trying to get at is why shutter lags, etc, are so important if you can just use burst mode. Thanks!

Amy

John_Reed
10-11-2004, 09:55 AM
Thanks, John. This is very helpful. One more question then: if you are doing something like watching a game or viewing wildlife, where you know you might miss shots, can you just leave a camera in burst mode? Why wouldn't you? I guess what I am trying to get at is why shutter lags, etc, are so important if you can just use burst mode. Thanks!

AmySome shots can't be taken with long shutter lag. If you wanted to shoot a dancer (or a pole vaulter) at the top of a jump, you'd follow them with your camera, and snap the shot right at the critical instant. If there's any shutter lag, you'll miss the shot. Burst mode takes pictures in rapid succession, but as to when each shot is snapped in the sequence, you have no control over that. So there definitely is a place in the world for low shutter lag. I feel the pinch with my FZ10 when I'm trying to shoot flying birds, for the same reason. I think the newer Panasonic models have greatly reduced shutter lag, and that's a good thing, as far as I'm concerned! :rolleyes:

D70FAN
10-11-2004, 03:20 PM
Thanks, John. This is very helpful. One more question then: if you are doing something like watching a game or viewing wildlife, where you know you might miss shots, can you just leave a camera in burst mode? Why wouldn't you? I guess what I am trying to get at is why shutter lags, etc, are so important if you can just use burst mode. Thanks!

Amy

If I may...

When you take pictures in "burst mode" or "continuous mode", the small (but very fast and realtively expensive) buffer memory fills-up and must download to the (slower) flash memory card.

While this is happening you can't take more pictures until there is buffer memory space available. This can be several seconds. So what many people do is shoot a "burst", wait for the download, and then shoot another "burst".

If you just continue to hold down the shutter, after the initial 5 or 6 frame burst shots, the frame rate falls to the download speed of the camera to the memory card, which again can be several seconds between shots. The time depends on the file size and the speed of the camera processor.

A fast memory card can make a difference on some cameras. But speeds beyond about 32X add more cost and deliver diminishing returns. If you want to spend the extra money on 40X and 80X memory cards (Usually with names like Ultra, and Extreme) you might be able to squeek out a little more performance.

Yes camera manufacturers could add more "fast" buffer memory, but it would also add dramatically to the cost of the camera, so in most cases they don't.

Hope that helps.

AmyM
10-11-2004, 03:38 PM
Yes, this information is very helpful -- thanks very much to both of you for sharing your knowledge!

Amy

kpurcell
10-12-2004, 06:05 AM
I use a Panasonic FZ10, and I can tell you that burst mode is a very nice feature. Say for example, you're at a baseball game, and you want to catch a pitcher throwing a pitch, or a batter swinging at the ball. These things happen too quickly for you to react and squeeze off your shot at the instant they occur, but with burst mode (which takes 5 shots at 4 frames/second), you can start the sequence and just let it roll, rather like a movie at a low frame rate, but at full camera resolution. When I was in Hawai'i recently and I wanted to catch the "green flash" that happens when the sun is just setting, I trained my camera on the sun, and just as it dipped below the horizon, started a 5-shot burst. The "flash" showed up in 3 of the 5 shots, something I didn't even see with my naked eye. :o


Man that must be beautiful. Can we see it?

John_Reed
10-12-2004, 06:19 AM
Man that must be beautiful. Can we see it?
http://john-reed.smugmug.com/photos/9376567-L.jpg

Janet
10-12-2004, 07:03 AM
Thanks
Janet