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stratboy535
10-10-2004, 03:39 PM
Hi All,
I am what could best be described as a “point and shoot” photographer, but obtaining some skills and knowledge are some goals of mine. Now that I have a little more free time I have enrolled in a photography basics class to get me started.

The problem is that I am leaving for a motorcycle trip next weekend and I would love to get some quick tips and hints to help point me in the right direction when it comes to taking shots outside. I have the new Panasonic FZ-20 and it does a great job in “idiot mode” but there is one type of shot that I have no clue how to make it happen. Most of my shots on the trip will be outdoor shots of fall foliage.

The shot in question is shooting in the direction of the sun with trees and scenery in the foreground. I have no clue how to brighten the foreground without having the sky get to over powering bright. Any quick tips?

One novice question... I have found that even on sunny days that some of the pics turn out very dark in comparison to the actual daylight when the shot was taken. I have increased the exposure which has helped. Can someone explain why this happens when taking shots outside? From my inexperienced perspective, it doesn’t make sense to have to increase the exposure on a sunny day.

Thanks for the help!

Craig

b.j.c
10-13-2004, 04:17 AM
Im afraid you really can't brighten up the foreground without sacrificing the sky... unless you go in for special filters that are clear down the bottom and darked up top.

Let me know if im wrong anyone

bjc

Atindra
10-13-2004, 05:21 AM
Hi Craig try to change whitebalance if you can and check the results, since I dont own fz20, I dont know about various options.
Atindra

John_Reed
10-13-2004, 07:25 AM
Hi All,
I am what could best be described as a “point and shoot” photographer, but obtaining some skills and knowledge are some goals of mine. Now that I have a little more free time I have enrolled in a photography basics class to get me started.

The problem is that I am leaving for a motorcycle trip next weekend and I would love to get some quick tips and hints to help point me in the right direction when it comes to taking shots outside. I have the new Panasonic FZ-20 and it does a great job in “idiot mode” but there is one type of shot that I have no clue how to make it happen. Most of my shots on the trip will be outdoor shots of fall foliage.

The shot in question is shooting in the direction of the sun with trees and scenery in the foreground. I have no clue how to brighten the foreground without having the sky get to over powering bright. Any quick tips?

One novice question... I have found that even on sunny days that some of the pics turn out very dark in comparison to the actual daylight when the shot was taken. I have increased the exposure which has helped. Can someone explain why this happens when taking shots outside? From my inexperienced perspective, it doesn’t make sense to have to increase the exposure on a sunny day.

Thanks for the help!

CraigSometimes, if the background is way light, and the foreground is way dark, there's nothing you can do with any camera to find an exposure level that shows good details in both. The answer for that would be "shoot at a different time of day." With my FZ10, I'm now shooting mostly in "Manual Exposure" mode, which lets me "dial in" (by using the "Exposure" button) the kind of scene contrast I want. As for why you have to increase the exposure on a sunny day, it all depends on what your camera was metering on. If, for example, you're spot metering on a swan, the camera tries to adjust its exposure to make those white feathers grey, which would darken the overall scene, generally. So you'd have to adjust the exposure to compensate for that. On the other hand, if you're metering on a blackbird, the camera's choice for exposure will make the rest of the scene WAY over-exposed, often beyond correction ability. If you haven't already tried it, the new "multi-zone" metering choices of the FZ20 should alleviate this somewhat. And if you're brave, you might also try using the M mode - it's easier than it sounds, and usually you can set it once and just shoot away, as long as the lighting doesn't change much for your subject(s). Not only that, the camera will remember your settings even after you turn it off and on again too.

Billiam
10-13-2004, 08:35 PM
Hi All,
The shot in question is shooting in the direction of the sun with trees and scenery in the foreground. I have no clue how to brighten the foreground without having the sky get to over powering bright. Any quick tips?


Craig

Cheat!

Bracket your exposure to get one frame that exposes the foreground correctly, and another to get the sky you want. Then merge the two later on in Photoshop.

Easier said than done, I know! :rolleyes:

Andy.ro
10-14-2004, 06:50 AM
yesterday i bought 2 digital camera magazines and i found this article about bracketing very interesting :) It is the way forward in a situation like this...

it's all about quick mask editing...gradients ...layer blending :)

Your turn to try :)

genece
10-14-2004, 11:05 AM
I use spot meter to meter right on the edge of the sky and the hills, Trees or whatever. I watch for A little blue in the sky thru the EVF. Most of the time the forground will be a little too dark, but that is the easy fix with a photoeditor, as long as it is not too dark. If you can see any detail at all in the dark part it will adjust just fine. Whereas replacing a blown out sky is much harder to fix, it can be done by it's not easy.