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kbshadow
11-26-2005, 02:04 PM
I'm new to photography and digital.

Have a Canon SD550 and like it.

I'm happy with most of the photos I have taken except my Dogs photo.

I have a very healthy and very shiney and very black,black lab.

I want to get a good photo of here face.

If I use the flash she is washed out and with no flash she is to dark.

Thanks in advance for any tips on how to get a good photo of her.

kbshadow
Stockton Ca

ktixx
11-26-2005, 03:06 PM
Either go outside in the daytime (bright overcast for best lighting), or in a room with lots of ambient light so you don't have to use the flash. Try turning the ISO to 200 or 400 and if you have to run the file though a noise reduction program. Make sure if you are indoors to set your camera to tungsten light or florecent light (depending on what you are under - most likely tungsten), Auto White Balance doesn't get it right all the time.
Good Luck
Ken

kbshadow
11-26-2005, 03:31 PM
Either go outside in the daytime (bright overcast for best lighting), or in a room with lots of ambient light so you don't have to use the flash. Try turning the ISO to 200 or 400 and if you have to run the file though a noise reduction program. Make sure if you are indoors to set your camera to tungsten light or florecent light (depending on what you are under - most likely tungsten), Auto White Balance doesn't get it right all the time.
Good Luck
Ken
Ken

Thanks, will do all of the above.

kbshadow
Stockton ca.

kornhauser
11-26-2005, 09:53 PM
I've done several animal shots for my department's K-9 dogs. I've found that outside; with fill-flash, produces the best results.

ReF
11-27-2005, 01:45 AM
if you gotta do it indoor then use the flash but back up it avoid a wash-out. you can also cover the flash temporarily with a piece of tissue to diffuse the light - it should look alot better than a bare, direct flash and can also help with refections from pets' eyes. if diffusing the flash blocks out too much light and you cannot increase flash output manually, then it's usually just a matter of getter closer or increasing the ISO. i would steer clear of ISO 400 as it is too noisy.

kbshadow
11-27-2005, 08:56 AM
Thanks everyone, going to try it today.

Thanks

kbshadow
Stockton Ca

baracus
12-03-2005, 02:14 PM
... you can also cover the flash temporarily with a piece of tissue to diffuse the light ....


A similar thing that worked for me is to bounce the flash using a piece of cardboard. I hold my camera in my right hand and the cardboard in my left, angled in from of the flash. Combining this technique with custom white balance, maximum aperture, and reasonably quick shutter speed, I can actually get good action shots of my pet rats in a very dark room.

The rats won't sit still for long, so I can't just use long exposures to get my shots. If I don't bounce the flash off of the cardboard, it reflects off of the wall behind the cage, the rats' white fur, the rats' toys, and the cage bars yielding a nasty white mess.

You can read more about flash techniques here: http://www.vividlight.com/articles/611.htm

The cardboard trick is used when you don't have a real bounce flash. You can use an envelope or business card too.

BTW: the combination that worked for my rat pics was 1/40 and f2.8

kbshadow
12-03-2005, 02:49 PM
A similar thing that worked for me is to bounce the flash using a piece of cardboard. I hold my camera in my right hand and the cardboard in my left, angled in from of the flash. Combining this technique with custom white balance, maximum aperture, and reasonably quick shutter speed, I can actually get good action shots of my pet rats in a very dark room.


You can read more about flash techniques here: http://www.vividlight.com/articles/611.htm

The cardboard trick is used when you don't have a real bounce flash. You can use an envelope or business card too.

BTW: the combination that worked for my rat pics was 1/40 and f2.8


Thanks, and thats really a good site for flash photos, thats a keeper.

kbshadow
stockton Ca

baracus
12-03-2005, 05:01 PM
This picture was taken by deflecting the flash with an envelope. The lens was a few cm from the rat's face.

Aperture: f3.2
Shutter: 1/20
ISO Speed: 100
Ambient Light: crummy incandescent ceiling fixture
Super Macro Mode

ReF
12-04-2005, 04:39 AM
A similar thing that worked for me is to bounce the flash using a piece of cardboard. I hold my camera in my right hand and the cardboard in my left, angled in from of the flash. Combining this technique with custom white balance, maximum aperture, and reasonably quick shutter speed, I can actually get good action shots of my pet rats in a very dark room.

The rats won't sit still for long, so I can't just use long exposures to get my shots. If I don't bounce the flash off of the cardboard, it reflects off of the wall behind the cage, the rats' white fur, the rats' toys, and the cage bars yielding a nasty white mess.

You can read more about flash techniques here: http://www.vividlight.com/articles/611.htm

The cardboard trick is used when you don't have a real bounce flash. You can use an envelope or business card too.

BTW: the combination that worked for my rat pics was 1/40 and f2.8

i use an external flash for bouncing off a ceiliing or card, but with the kind of flashes attached to most point and shoots (non swiveling external flashes too), how would you keep the flash from firing directly at the subject while bouncing it at the same time? do you have to block the direct flash or reflect it towards the ceiling or card? or are you using an external bounce flash? thanks

deadman
12-04-2005, 08:37 AM
When you say angled in from the flash what do you mean? Holding the cardboard over the flash pointing downwards? Under and pointng upwards? Not sure I understand exactly how you 'angle' the card in relation to the flash.

Also since you seem to be well aqainted with flash photography I have another question. I have just got a bounce and swivel slave flash that works on an optical sensor since my Canon S2 has no hot shoe or PC cable connector. I also have a Flipit diffuser on order for it. My question is whether leaving the internal flash 'as is' whilst using the external slave flash is a good or bad idea. Will the internal flash still cause red eye for instance or will the external flash sort that out even when the internal flash is still in use? Or would it be better to put something in front of the internal flash to deflect it away but still allow it to trigger the external flash sensor?

Thanks for the advice.

baracus
12-04-2005, 04:23 PM
i use an external flash for bouncing off a ceiliing or card, but with the kind of flashes attached to most point and shoots (non swiveling external flashes too), how would you keep the flash from firing directly at the subject while bouncing it at the same time? do you have to block the direct flash or reflect it towards the ceiling or card? or are you using an external bounce flash? thanks

If you have an external bounce flash (one that tilts up), you can just point it where you want it to avoid that direct flash washout. Since I'm using the built-in flash on my Z3, I cheat and emulate a bounce flash by reflecting the flash upwards.

I've attached three diagrams to illustrate this. In the first diagram, the built in flash is blasting the subject and the picture looks awful:
http://tinyurl.com/9wu3b

In the second diagram a piece of cardboard is used to redirect the flash toward the ceiling:
http://tinyurl.com/83twd

In the third diagram a real redirectable bounce flash is used to achieve the same effect:
http://tinyurl.com/cwcr2

I've also attached two sample images to further illustrate the effects:

Direct:
http://tinyurl.com/dszn3

Bounced:
http://tinyurl.com/8b6n5


Here's more info on external flashes in general (and a picture of a bounce flash):
http://www.cs.mtu.edu/~shene/DigiCam/User-Guide/FZ-10/Ext-Flash/Basic-Functions.html

baracus
12-04-2005, 04:34 PM
When you say angled in from the flash what do you mean? Holding the cardboard over the flash pointing downwards? Under and pointng upwards? Not sure I understand exactly how you 'angle' the card in relation to the flash.

Also since you seem to be well aqainted with flash photography I have another question. I have just got a bounce and swivel slave flash that works on an optical sensor since my Canon S2 has no hot shoe or PC cable connector. I also have a Flipit diffuser on order for it. My question is whether leaving the internal flash 'as is' whilst using the external slave flash is a good or bad idea. Will the internal flash still cause red eye for instance or will the external flash sort that out even when the internal flash is still in use? Or would it be better to put something in front of the internal flash to deflect it away but still allow it to trigger the external flash sensor?

Thanks for the advice.


I think the diagrams I just posted will answer your first question. This is a very low-tech solution that I learned from my father years ago.

I don't really know that much about photography. My father was a professional photographer when I was very young. As I grew up he taught me a lot, but I've forgotten most of it. Now that I can finally afford a semi-decent camera (dslrs are out of my price range), I'm trying to rediscover what he taught me.

Sometimes I'll run into problems like this and I'll remember the solution he showed me. If not, I just call him and bug him to help me out, even if that can be tough to do over the phone.


As far as using two flashes (one built-in, one external), I read on a site recently (see my link earlier in this thread) that sometimes you do that intentionally. I know that you frequently use multiple varied light sources when lighting for filming movies in order to soften shadows and increase the distinction between your subject and the background.

ReF
12-05-2005, 01:16 AM
When you say angled in from the flash what do you mean? Holding the cardboard over the flash pointing downwards? Under and pointng upwards? Not sure I understand exactly how you 'angle' the card in relation to the flash.

Also since you seem to be well aqainted with flash photography I have another question. I have just got a bounce and swivel slave flash that works on an optical sensor since my Canon S2 has no hot shoe or PC cable connector. I also have a Flipit diffuser on order for it. My question is whether leaving the internal flash 'as is' whilst using the external slave flash is a good or bad idea. Will the internal flash still cause red eye for instance or will the external flash sort that out even when the internal flash is still in use? Or would it be better to put something in front of the internal flash to deflect it away but still allow it to trigger the external flash sensor?

Thanks for the advice.

i would at least diffuse it or turn the flash exposure compensation way down, maybe both. you'll still get a harsh blast of light and shiny refections if you leave the internal flash settings as is. baracus said it pretty well with this:

"As far as using two flashes (one built-in, one external), I read on a site recently (see my link earlier in this thread) that sometimes you do that intentionally. I know that you frequently use multiple varied light sources when lighting for filming movies in order to soften shadows and increase the distinction between your subject and the background."

there are a few photographers here that specialize in portraits and should be able to elaborate more on using multiple light sources.