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View Full Version : fz20 not only a lot of noise.. moiré too!!!!



skyfree
10-03-2004, 05:54 PM
:eek: :confused: :(

look @ this photo
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_fz20-review/P1000013.JPG

it is noticeable the moiré effect on the building...

donkuok@yahoo.com.sg
10-03-2004, 06:09 PM
:eek: :confused: :(

look @ this photo
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_fz20-review/P1000013.JPG

it is noticeable the moiré effect on the building...

Yup..I own a FZ20 also found fair bits of noise in there. However, this does not affect me as the camera is packed with lots of features, especially the MEGA OIS and CA. Noise can be removed using Noise Ninja software. But u can't remove purple fringe and blur image.

Mike C.
10-03-2004, 06:17 PM
Ok, what the heck is moire?

Thanks .... Mike :confused:

Jeff Keller
10-03-2004, 06:27 PM
:eek: :confused: :(

look @ this photo
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_fz20-review/P1000013.JPG

it is noticeable the moiré effect on the building...

Even the Nikon D70 shows moiré in that shot!

skyfree
10-04-2004, 03:22 AM
Noise can be removed using Noise Ninja software. But u can't remove purple fringe and blur image.

ok you can remove it using noise ninja or digital gem pro or everything you want... however you will lose sharpness, the photo will look a little blurry.. purple fringing can be removed with photoshop if you are able to use it, there isn't an automatic function, but you can do it manually. I agree that a blurry image will remain a blurry image... even if you can use the sharpen mask of photoshop (can helps.. but can't do miracle ;) ) However noise isn't a problem if your purpose is to print normal size photos but if you want to use larger size, or if you just want to look these on monitor it does really matter.. I don't say is the worst camera on the market.. I think it is the best ultra zoom.. I think that only during daylight fz10 wins..

[QUOTE=Jeff Keller]Even the Nikon D70 shows moiré in that shot!

I own a nikon d70 and I'm not so happy but I must say that moiré comes out not so often. (My problem is that I can't obtain a good calibration... even if i send it to different pro print services and I don't retouch using photoshop i get always "warm" photos..).

Jayde
10-04-2004, 03:29 AM
moire is like looking at a fine wired fence across the road, creates circular patterns as u move your head or a metal strainer mesh in kitchen..
lovly patterm yumm :)

and u can remove purple fringing in one plane new s/w is out... im looking for it..
even DSLR`S have lens distortions probs..

Jayde
10-04-2004, 03:57 AM
Award-winning Optical corrections remove distortion, vignetting, blur and lateral CA

http://dolabs.com/en/photo/optics_pro/feat_benefits.php

:)

judge9847
10-04-2004, 04:14 AM
:eek: :confused: :(
look @ this photo
http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/panasonic/dmc_fz20-review/P1000013.JPG
it is noticeable the moiré effect on the building...
I find this very interesting indeed. I've downloaded the image and I've had a look at the EXIF data because my first reaction was that some digital zoom had been used. But that's not so. In fact, not too much optical zoom was used either so maxing out the zoom isn't creating a problem.

It is a very large image indeed and when I look at it at 100% in Paint Shop Pro 8 and Photoshop Elements 2, there is, to my way of seeing it, a certain lack of clarity and what I have described in the past as "noise". Again, in the past I've put that down to over compression by Panasonic but after a discussion in this forum, I'm not so sure that's what it is.

The blue sky does contain that "noise" as I called it. I find that interesting because after the discussion here, I now have a view that it's not really "noise" but something that may be, just may be created by the OIS as it functions. I'm finding that image quality is DEFINITELY improved if, when using the zoom at something lower than say 8 or 10X or thereabouts, the IS is switched off.

A couple of things though. I really can't see the moiré effect - I'd be delighted if you could somehow highlight or explain where you see it. I'm just thinking that maybe it's a function of the monitor's screen rather than the image itself? Maybe? I'm using a quite ancient but still very capable 21" Trinitron CRT badged as a Dell. I've regularly run Adobe's Gamma check on it so I'm happy that I'm looking at the image in it's best light. And right now, the moiré escapes me.

In addition, after another recent thread here, I'm now convinced that if a tripod or some sort of steadying device is used with the Panasonic Megazoom cameras, the IS should definitely be switched off. It seems that it does continue to try and function even though the camera is rock steady at 12X zoom. The IS seems to be expecting movement and therefore compensates - or attempts to - for it. Result is a less than sharp image. I've proved to my own satisfaction that is the case though it's difficult of course to point to any one photo and say "See how much better that is!"

So I'm beginning to feel that the IS is really meant for conditions where the camera is hand-held at the longer ends of the zoom. For all else, switch it off. As I say, it's just the beginning of a "theory" and I'm going to try and see if it really is the case.

skyfree
10-06-2004, 06:45 PM
look at the top of the pyramid, there are white patterns... :)

I don't think that noise depend on image stabilization... however we can try to take some shoot of the sky with an without IS.