PDA

View Full Version : Help needed with Canon S2 IS settings



KKAOS
10-31-2005, 01:20 AM
Hey guys, im a newbie here, dont know if this is the right section to place this post in, but I need some help !

My problem is with the shot I took with my Powershot S2 IS camera a few nights ago at a recent indoor car show which inside is very well lit up with lighting. My problem is that the shot came out very "dull" looking with no true vibrant colour. The shot was taken on "auto" setting with no adjustment and no flash.

http://i.pbase.com/v3/38/608838/1/51482730.FridaySetup156.jpg

Now this shot below was taken on canon A75 in the same lighting conditions at a different show with the exact same car, as you can notice, its more rich in colour than the above photo. I just cant remember what setting it was taken at, and for the canon users out there who have used the S2 IS, which setting is best to use for such conditions, eg. Av ? Tv ? Auto ?

http://i.pbase.com/v3/38/608838/1/51564496.IMG_0017.jpg

Can someone please explain to me what im doing wrong ?


Thanks for all your help, much appreciated.

Balrog
10-31-2005, 05:58 AM
There should be a Saturation setting somewhere, you can boost that. Check your manual.

Firas
10-31-2005, 09:05 AM
In my S2 manual it's on page 94 titled "Changing the Photo Effect". You want to select the "Vivid" setting. That'll give you a good boost in the colors.

Hope that helps.

JTL
10-31-2005, 12:45 PM
There should be a Saturation setting somewhere, you can boost that. Check your manual.Balrog is right...it's one of the "Custom Effect" settings...instructions for using the Custom Effect settings and increasing saturation start on page 94 of the manual as well, under the heading Changing the Photo Effect.

I reccomend using Custom Effect (and increasing saturation) over using the "Vivid" setting because when use use Custom Effect you can also lower the contrast setting which will cause the "clipping" of highlights if you don't. You can also adjust the in-camera sharpening as well via Custom Effect.

Another trick to use in conjuction with the above is to manually slightly underexpose your shots...the S2's metering system by default slightly over-exposes, thus washing out the shots a bit...

KKAOS
11-01-2005, 02:27 AM
I really appreciate your help and input guys. One thing I also noticed was that my canon was only set to "fine" not "super fine". Now I have set it to super fine mode, would you think that this could have made it look a bit dull also ????

Changing the quality from fine to super fine make much of a difference ???

JTL
11-01-2005, 04:10 PM
I really appreciate your help and input guys. One thing I also noticed was that my canon was only set to "fine" not "super fine". Now I have set it to super fine mode, would you think that this could have made it look a bit dull also ????

Changing the quality from fine to super fine make much of a difference ???My mantra is always shoot at the highest resolution possible...let's put it this way...if you ever want to print large or crop, you will be very upset if you didn't shoot on superfine...

I don't think it would have anything to do with the "dullness", though...the other factors mentioned were the culprits for sure...

KKAOS
11-01-2005, 11:26 PM
Thanks once again. I know im asking too many questions, but I have another question in regards to the metering option. Which option should it be set on? As I believe there are 3 metering options, one which is just a square, one with a little dot in the square and one with about 3 squares in the one square ?

JTL
11-02-2005, 11:10 AM
Thanks once again. I know im asking too many questions, but I have another question in regards to the metering option. Which option should it be set on? As I believe there are 3 metering options, one which is just a square, one with a little dot in the square and one with about 3 squares in the one square ?You can never ask too many questions! :)

The three metering modes are:

Spot - meters only the area in the AF frame (frame is moveable).

Center Weighted Average - Averages all light entering camera, but gives greater emphasis to the center of the frame.

Evaluative (called Matrix Metering on some cameras) - Divides the frame into metered zones and tries to create the correct exposure based on a programmatic evaluation of those zones. It is the default setting on the S2 and it probably works fine for most people in most situations.

Like all programs, Evaluate Metering is only as good as the programmer who created the algorithm and the limitations of the technology. I find that it can make huge exposure mistakes, but actually works in most situations where there is not a high-contrast situation...but I don't generally use it.

Center Weighted Average is a fairly imprecise metering method, but at least on the S2, it handles high contrast scenes better then Evaluative.

Spot Metering is the most precise method and is what I generally use.

KKAOS
11-03-2005, 02:28 AM
Appreciate your help JTL.

So, in my case where im using it in an environment such as an enclosed indoor car show with plenty of lighting inside, what would be the best metering option I should set it on ?

Also, I take images at ISO 100, will increasing the ISO to say 200 be better for when I use my camera at car shows with lighting ?

JTL
11-04-2005, 10:01 AM
So, in my case where im using it in an environment such as an enclosed indoor car show with plenty of lighting inside, what would be the best metering option I should set it on ?To be perfectly honest, I don't know. I've never shot the S2 in a large enclosed space with multiple sources of artificial light. But, my gut tells me to use Evalutive Metering and see if the exposurers look good (remember to try a few shots decreasing the EV by -1/3 to -2/3 of a stop and see how they look as well). Hey...the beauty of digital is you can take dozens of test shots with different settings and the only thing it costs you is time...and the feedback is instant! Just keep track of what settings work best for particular situations...


Also, I take images at ISO 100, will increasing the ISO to say 200 be better for when I use my camera at car shows with lighting?That depends. Given the shot you posted, if it was taken at ISO 100, I don't see any reason to change it. There are only two situations that I can think of that would force you to go to ISO 200: 1) There simply is not enough light to get a good exposure, even at f/2.7-f/3.5. 2) You require greater depth-of-field and are forced to shoot with a smaller aperture, but doing so causes the shutter speed to be too slow (let's say below 1/30 sec....even with IS, to be on the safe side).

But, here's a quick way to tell. Next time you're at a show, give yourself a little extra time and try this...set the ISO to 100, set the Custom Settings to Saturation +1, Sharpnesss +1 and Contrast 0 (or even -1 if there are "whites" or high-contrast elements in the scene), EV -1/3. Now put the camera in "P Mode" and half-depress the shutter release and see what the camera says as far as exposure info (also pay attention to the zone-of-focus/depth-of-field). If the scene appears too dark or you see a lot of red indicators or everything that you want is not in focus, then you know you may have to bump up the ISO.

KKAOS
11-07-2005, 07:12 PM
JTL, much appreciated and thanks for your input. I will definately go and have a good play around with it taking different shots with different settings, practice makes perfect !! Thanks once again guys.

KKAOS
11-08-2005, 03:11 AM
Guys, would taking shots within the enviroment I mentioned (big exhibition halls with lighting) taking them on the "AV" mode help ?

So therefore, I select an aperture and let the camera automatically adjust to the exposure itself ? Would that be a better option ?

And select the metering to Evaluative aka Matrix metering ?

JTL
11-22-2005, 09:38 PM
Guys, would taking shots within the enviroment I mentioned (big exhibition halls with lighting) taking them on the "AV" mode help ?

So therefore, I select an aperture and let the camera automatically adjust to the exposure itself ? Would that be a better option ?

And select the metering to Evaluative aka Matrix metering ?You could try it, but if the camera decided it needed to use a small f/stop and go ISO 400...you might wind up with a noiser image than necessary. But, once again, there's an easy way to get good feedback from the camera. To try your suggestion...take a shot in Av mode...now put the camera in playback mode and press the DISP button twice...you will see all of the shot details, including the ISO setting that was used (so why can't they include it in the EXIF? :confused: ). If it's 200 or less, you should be o.k. (preferably it's 50 or 100, but that's not always possible) to shoot away. Pay attention to the histogram as well to make sure you got a good exposure...

Good Luck! Let's hear back on how you do! :)

Dawoofo
12-01-2005, 06:57 PM
One other thing worth mentioning here is white balance. Sometimes automatic white balance doesn't do its job, and the picture can come out several shades differently than what you saw. That looks like flourescent light, for which there's a preset on the S2. I recently took my camera to my daughter's basketball game, and not trusting the AWB I used a woman's white pants below me in the bleachers to set my white balance, and the pictures turned out a very good color (though somewhat blurry). :D