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Volo
10-19-2005, 08:21 PM
I've got a Canon S50 and have trouble taking indoor photos. The pictures are either blurry or too dark overall. The flash is okay, but tends to highlight only the people it's centered on and casts everything else really darkly - an effect I hate. I'm fine shooting outdoors, but am a novice for indoor photography, especially when my subjects are alway moving and I can't really ask them to keep still while I try & try again for a good photo. I'm wondering if there is a quick setting to use or general pointers to follow for indoor photography. Any advice appreciated. (again I'm a novice who loves my camera. I know there are better and newer camera out there but I'd like to stick by the one I have and at least learn all the ropes on this one first :) )

Joker
10-20-2005, 02:11 PM
I'm in the same boat at the moment. I don't really like using flash all that much, so the combination of somewhat longer shutter speeds and my shakey hands leads to a bit of blur.

It's just a matter of testing to find the right shutter speed and aperture.

John_Reed
10-20-2005, 06:26 PM
I've got a Canon S50 and have trouble taking indoor photos. The pictures are either blurry or too dark overall. The flash is okay, but tends to highlight only the people it's centered on and casts everything else really darkly - an effect I hate. I'm fine shooting outdoors, but am a novice for indoor photography, especially when my subjects are alway moving and I can't really ask them to keep still while I try & try again for a good photo. I'm wondering if there is a quick setting to use or general pointers to follow for indoor photography. Any advice appreciated. (again I'm a novice who loves my camera. I know there are better and newer camera out there but I'd like to stick by the one I have and at least learn all the ropes on this one first :) )I have a stabilized camera, and that helps a lot, but it still takes good technique to hold the camera steady enough for sharp shots. One thing I've found is I get a lot better results by using the optical viewfinder. This forces the camera up against my face, which really helps to stabilize it. Are you shooting by using the LCD, or have you tried using your optical viewfinder, just to see if it helps? Then, as you squeeze off a shot, keep the tip of your finger on the button, so that as you squeeze, you're only squeezing the button, not the camera.

I hope that helps?

Volo
10-22-2005, 08:06 AM
Thanks for the tip. I've already gotten the photographer's stance down to make my hold more steady & use the optical viewfinder as well. I'm just wondering if anyone else has problems with indoor photos in terms of exposure. It's difficult to test aperature settings while there's a lot of things going on and there's no time to waste. Giving longer exposure times is okay, but when the subjects are moving they're blurry (the background is exposed sharp & fine). Setting to auto the flash always fires and I get the subject supremely highlighted with a blanket of darkness around and then I lose the background.:( If I turn the flash off things get blurry. :eek:

Kuroyume
10-22-2005, 08:58 AM
Try increasing the ISO...

that should allow for faster sppeds, at the expense of noisier images.

EyeOnYou
10-23-2005, 04:30 PM
I've got a Canon S50 and have trouble taking indoor photos. The pictures are either blurry or too dark overall. The flash is okay, but tends to highlight only the people it's centered on and casts everything else really darkly - an effect I hate. I'm fine shooting outdoors, but am a novice for indoor photography, especially when my subjects are alway moving and I can't really ask them to keep still while I try & try again for a good photo. I'm wondering if there is a quick setting to use or general pointers to follow for indoor photography. Any advice appreciated. (again I'm a novice who loves my camera. I know there are better and newer camera out there but I'd like to stick by the one I have and at least learn all the ropes on this one first :) )

If the subjects you are taking are moving and they can't sit still, use the sports mode, that will fire the flash and you'll get make everything still. If the lighting is good enough not to use the flash, use the sports mode without the flash, i've done that a few times and it's given me some good shots. but if you have poor lighting, use the flash but deflect it towards the ceiling, that will light up the area and doesn't darken the background.

EyeOnYou
10-23-2005, 04:30 PM
I've got a Canon S50 and have trouble taking indoor photos. The pictures are either blurry or too dark overall. The flash is okay, but tends to highlight only the people it's centered on and casts everything else really darkly - an effect I hate. I'm fine shooting outdoors, but am a novice for indoor photography, especially when my subjects are alway moving and I can't really ask them to keep still while I try & try again for a good photo. I'm wondering if there is a quick setting to use or general pointers to follow for indoor photography. Any advice appreciated. (again I'm a novice who loves my camera. I know there are better and newer camera out there but I'd like to stick by the one I have and at least learn all the ropes on this one first :) )

If the subjects you are taking are moving and they can't sit still, use the sports mode, that will fire the flash and you'll get make everything still. If the lighting is good enough not to use the flash, use the sports mode without the flash, i've done that a few times and it's given me some good shots. but if you have poor lighting, use the flash but deflect it towards the ceiling, that will light up the area and doesn't darken the background.

Wolfeden
10-24-2005, 08:27 AM
I am using a S30 and suffer from the same problem. My solution is to use "speed" mode as the default setting + continous shooting mode. Works quite well for longer distance shoots, but for micro shots, still an issue. Looking for a new camera with "image stabilizer" feature, was told that it might help.

David Metsky
10-24-2005, 10:53 AM
If your subject is moving, IS will not help you much. It keeps you still, not the moving subject. IS allows you to keep the shutter open longer, which is exactly what you don't want with a moving subject if you want a crisp shot.

-dave-