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View Full Version : Kodak Easy Share DX7440 - Low light club concert



Brooklyn Girl
09-08-2005, 08:22 PM
Hi! I'm a newbie to this forum and to cameras. I have the Kodak DX7440. I think it's a great camera but I have not had good luck with taking concert photos.

I am going to a small club to see a band but I don't want to annoy them with my flash. I'd like to take photos but I don't know the settings necessary to take photos in low light without losing quality and just getting lots of blurry, grainy shots.

As I said, I'm a novice and don't know about aperture, ISO, shutter speed, etc.

Can someone help me? :(

eastbluffs
09-08-2005, 11:13 PM
Hi! I'm a newbie to this forum and to cameras. I have the Kodak DX7440. I think it's a great camera but I have not had good luck with taking concert photos.

I am going to a small club to see a band but I don't want to annoy them with my flash. I'd like to take photos but I don't know the settings necessary to take photos in low light without losing quality and just getting lots of blurry, grainy shots.

As I said, I'm a novice and don't know about aperture, ISO, shutter speed, etc.

Can someone help me? :(

To quote a review at http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/DX7440/DX74A.HTM#specs

"Image Noise: Low image noise at low ISOs. Also low at higher ISO settings, but a heavy price is paid in terms of image detail. ... The net effect isn't too bad at ISO 200, but the ISO 400 shot looks almost like a watercolor painting in places. - Don't shoot with the DX7440 at ISO settings over 200 if you care about subtle detail in your photos."

ISO sets how sensitive the camera is to light. If set higher (like ISO 400) it amplifies the light more (twice that of ISO 200). The trade off is lower image quality (this varies greatly between cameras).

Although this camera seems better than average on low-light performance, If you don't want to use a flash, I doubt you'll get any good shots indoors on it.

Try setting the ISO up to 400, turn off the flash, put it on "A" mode, set the "Apeture" to the widest possible (lowest number), and do some test shooting. Basically, that's the best this camera will achieve in low light.

Beyond that, you could get a mono-pod or find some other means of not moving the camera around, and situate yourself so there aren't bright lights facing the camera (unless you want that siloette look) and hopefully good lighting on the band.

Otherwise; get the Fuji F10 and set it to ISO 1600. It has special low-light capability far beyond any other point-and-shoot camera under $500.

Needless to say, this camera will only produce pictures suitable for casual use. If you're planning to be the band photographer, either rent a more professional Digital SLR camera or buy a film SLR and get high ISO film. If you do the latter, get a lot more advice first.