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GMNelson
09-23-2004, 09:06 PM
Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

Gracias.

meng-chieh
10-10-2004, 09:56 AM
Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

Gracias.

Moon pics are extremely hard to take considering the low- or virtually non-existent lighting available. However, if your camera has a bulb mode, I'd suggest using that. Furthermore, a remote shutter release control and a tripod are all considered a must during night pics. If a remote shutter release is not available to you, simply use the timer feature. Good luck!

niknak
10-19-2004, 02:07 AM
I disagree with the last post - a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.

If you're just trying to get a clear picture of the moon then there is a fairly easy rule of thumb - the "Sunny 16" rule:

Shutter speed 1/ISO at f16. (I don't know the specifics of your model of camera but this rule works on my Fuji S7000).

Also if your camera has an auto-bracketing mode use that and set it to +/- 0.7 EV.

Juggle the shutter speed and aperture as necessary to stay within your camera's limits and check the pictures as you take them.

Focusing is another problem - if your camera supports it set the focus to infinity. If not, another trick is to leave the lens cap on and half-press the shutter button - the camera will try to focus but fail - most digital cameras will leave the lens focused at infinity. Set the focusing mode to manual before removing the lens cap.

Also a tripod is essential for the slow shutter speeds being used. A cable release is also essential if your camera supports it - if you can't use a cable release then use the camera's timer.

Lastly get out of town and the higher up you are the better (the air is cleaner and thinner).

Hope this helps.

HawkeyeLonewolf
10-20-2004, 06:47 PM
http://www.peidev.com/peimain/img/photos/camaron%20moon.jpg

This is with my Panasonic FZ20 using Shutter priority mode (hand held)

wus
11-19-2004, 03:55 PM
IF

a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.

I wonder why I should use a slow shutter speed? Don't normally need that for a sunny landscape shot ...

Actually I know (from experience) that I do need a tripod and long exposure time, but if you think about it ... it's true, the moon (at least its visible part) has sunshine at full blast, not attenuated by any atmosphere. Why do I need long exposure time and / or high sensitivity to shoot it then? Can anyone enlighten me, please?

-------------------------
leave nothing but footprints, take nothing but pictures

aeapen
12-02-2004, 02:33 AM
Attaching Moon taken at 32X Digital zoom with Canon S1 IS... Without any lens, tripod etc used. Just using Imange Stabilizer ON...

Rhys
12-02-2004, 08:29 AM
Ok. This was taken at about a 60th as far as I can recall (my GF's PC doesn't have software to read exif data). It's handheld, IS on and was taken from Columbia, SC a few days ago.

Treasuredude
12-03-2004, 06:29 PM
Here is a pic taken with my FZ3.

http://pie.midco.net/treasuredude/moon6.jpg

I think you'll have better results if you avoid the full moon. A half moon or smaller will have more shadow and bring out the crater details better.

A95_sucka
12-28-2004, 02:07 AM
If these images were taken handheld, imagine how much sharper they would be with the use of a tripod or the camera otherwise steadied (props, balancing on a sloped surface, etc.)...

Rhys
12-28-2004, 05:42 AM
If these images were taken handheld, imagine how much sharper they would be with the use of a tripod or the camera otherwise steadied (props, balancing on a sloped surface, etc.)...

Heh. The moon races across the sky at a heck of a lick. I did a tripod shot of the moon with slide film once. I reckoned on a 10 minute exposure to illuminate the landscape as well. The moon turned into a long cylinder because over the course of 10 minutes it had moved so far. It must have moved 3 times its width over those 10 minutes.

The moon is 3,476km in diameter and travels at a speed ranging between 0.968 km/s and 1.082 km/s. The average is 1.022km/s

This all means that by the time a 1/60th exposure is completed, the subject has moved (1.022km/s / 60 =) 17 meters. This is not condusive to sharp images.

In terms of the angle that the moon will move in 1/60th of a second, I suppose it is minimal unless one uses a long-range lens. I once viewed the moon through an astronomical telescope and it moved so fast it was hard to keep up with - especially since the telescope was calibrated for steller motion and not lunar.

For more moon information, please view this webpage Lunar data (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon)

A95_sucka
12-28-2004, 11:19 PM
Lol, I guess if you really wanted to do a 10min exposure, find a way of mounting a camera on one of those automated telescope tripods which can track the course of celestial objects.

Rhys
12-29-2004, 06:15 AM
Lol, I guess if you really wanted to do a 10min exposure, find a way of mounting a camera on one of those automated telescope tripods which can track the course of celestial objects.

Ah. It won't work like that. Most if not all astronomical telescopes are set on an axis to match the earth's rotation. The moon rotates around the earth and therefore doesn't follow stellar motions.

I'm not sure what angle you'd need but I bet it's not 23.4 degrees!

Lest
01-14-2005, 04:35 PM
I took a nice one yesterday evening which I put up if this test works as I am nt sure how to post pics on here
http://www.mp3.com/images/cover/200/drf700/f772/f77203g9eqg.jpg

Lest
01-14-2005, 04:49 PM
Thats a nice one treasuredude! Handheld or Tripod?

This one was on a tripod and the result of about 2 dozen pics at wildly varying settings!

Taken ON a tripod with a DMC FZ20 (my new baby)
ISO 80
Shutter 1/10
Aperture f/8

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/laura.paulton/linkimages/P1010500.jpg

Treasuredude
01-27-2005, 08:18 PM
Mine was taken on a wobbling Walmart tripod. I had to use the self timer to give the tripod time to stop shaking!

dwig
01-28-2005, 08:15 AM
I disagree with the last post - a full moon is actually a sunny landscape.

If you're just trying to get a clear picture of the moon then there is a fairly easy rule of thumb - the "Sunny 16" rule:


Almost dead on. The moon surface is somewhat of a dark grey and often yields the best image when you us the "Hazy Bright" values from the "Sunny 16" rule. This would be more like f/11 with the shutter speed set to match the ISO.

Also, as mentioned already, the moons appearant motion (caused mostly by the earth's spinning rather than the moon's own proper motion) is fast enough to cause motion blur with exposures longer than 1/60 with normal lenses and may require highter speeds (1/250th and up) with long telephotos.

Of course, when you are photographing the dark earthshine lit, rather than the bright sunlit, portions of a cresent or new moon, you have a rather low light situation that cannot be properly photographed without the type of tracking mount found on astronomical telescopes and then one that has a lunar mode in addition to the common stellar mode. The necessary shutter speed is way too long to get a sharp pix otherwise.

r0nn13
01-28-2005, 10:12 AM
Taken with my new Canon Powershot S1 IS. This was the best 2 out of about 20 shots...

10x Optical and 32x Digital zoom
1/500th Sec
f/5.0
ISO400

I cropped and merged the images for easier on screen viewing.

http://www.valaron2.eclipse.co.uk/images/Moon(10x&32x).jpg

gary_hendricks
02-10-2005, 09:48 AM
Let's say I want to take some pictures of a full moon. What would be the most appropriate settings for such an image? I have a Sony DSC-F717 and have set it to manual, played around with a few different settings, but have not achieved a very good shot - yet. Suggestions for shutter speed, ISO setting, apeture size, etc. would be greatly appreciated. Would it also be helpful to use a filter of some kind?

Gracias.

Look at this article for more information:
http://www.nightscapes.net/techniques/PhotographingMoon/PhotographingMoon.html
:cool: