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Ali_baba
08-29-2005, 11:11 AM
Camera: C-765
Mode using: Program Mode (P)
Metering: Spot metering

I guess that I have given enough information before posting my problem. Please ask for more information if needed.

Ok, here is the problem. When I try to take the photo with clouds VISIBLE in the photos then the photos come dark. When the exposure in photos are ok then clouds are too bright. Here are the samples to give you an idea.

This photo has clouds visible but background is dark

http://img351.imageshack.us/img351/2634/p8200059large0oi.jpg


This photo lost the clouds when I am concern about the subject.

http://img351.imageshack.us/img351/38/p8200060large8kd.jpg

Any suggestions? What settings I shall be using next time?

Thanks in advance :)

Norm in Fujino
08-31-2005, 06:17 AM
You've run into one of the classical problems of all photography: insufficient latitude. Good digital sensors have about the same amount of latitude as slide film, which means only 5-6 real steps ("zones") of exposure. In your shot, you have contrast ranging from deep shadows to bright, bright skies, and that probably represents a full 10 zones. There's no way you can get your digicam's sensor to record all that range of contrast. There are things you can do, including using a tripod and taking multiple exposures at different settings, then blending them (for this method, do a google search for "blending exposures"). Another thing you can do is to shoot in RAW (if your camera has that option), then shoot as close to the bright side as possible without blocking out your whites (use the histogram function on your camera to check it), then using a good RAW developer to try to pull out detail from the shadows. You may be able to save a step or so using that technique. Without using such special techniques, though, you're basically limited by the digital technology and JPEG format, and have to be satisfied at taking pictures of scenes with narrower range of contrasts.

kornhauser
08-31-2005, 06:43 AM
You've run into one of the classical problems of all photography: insufficient latitude. Good digital sensors have about the same amount of latitude as slide film, which means only 5-6 real steps ("zones") of exposure. In your shot, you have contrast ranging from deep shadows to bright, bright skies, and that probably represents a full 10 zones. There's no way you can get your digicam's sensor to record all that range of contrast. There are things you can do, including using a tripod and taking multiple exposures at different settings, then blending them (for this method, do a google search for "blending exposures"). Another thing you can do is to shoot in RAW (if your camera has that option), then shoot as close to the bright side as possible without blocking out your whites (use the histogram function on your camera to check it), then using a good RAW developer to try to pull out detail from the shadows. You may be able to save a step or so using that technique. Without using such special techniques, though, you're basically limited by the digital technology and JPEG format, and have to be satisfied at taking pictures of scenes with narrower range of contrasts.



Agreed. When I find something to shoot that I "must have", I'll shoot a multitude of pictures. Thankfully with digital, I only have to find the one I like and I'll delete the rest. Maybe it's true that digital still has drawbacks to 35mm film, but cost isn't one of them. I don't care to fill a whole card if it's something special.

Ali_baba
09-01-2005, 11:17 AM
@Norm in Fujino and Kornhauser, thanks for your tips. I really appericiate it. I will follow your suggestions to overcome on this problem. I had no idea that this is the most classical problem in digital photography world :eek:


Thanks a lot :)

Norm in Fujino
09-01-2005, 10:16 PM
I will follow your suggestions to overcome on this problem.


One easy thing you could try when shooting JPEGs: look at the menus on your 765 and find the control for "contrast"; lower that setting as far as it will go and it may help some with this kind of high-contrast scene. Be sure to reset it after taking your pictures, tho, or you'll end up with low-contrast shots on everything.

Ali_baba
09-03-2005, 11:45 AM
Thanks Norm in Fujino for your advice :)

nwpoland
09-04-2005, 10:52 AM
Just another thought...

I was taking some pics around town yesterday and after looking at them realized that the sky kept getting overexposed while the subject was correctly exposed. If you use Photoshop (can't speak for other programs), you can adjust "levels" in different parts of the same image. Just use the lasso tool (or whatever means of selection you prefer -- the magic wand works well to select the sky if it's mostly lighter colors) and adjust levels. That might save your incorrectly exposed areas...does the trick for me.

Ali_baba
09-05-2005, 01:08 PM
Thanks for the tip nwpoland. Dziękują :)